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Types & Stages

 
Types & Stages

Chapter: 5 - Types & Stages

Subchapter: 7 - Inflammatory Breast Cancer

Inflammatory Breast Cancer is another uncommon but aggressive form of cancer, in which abnormal cells infiltrate the skin and lymph vessels of the breast. This type of cancer usually does not produce a distinct tumor or lump that can be felt and isolated within the breast. Symptoms begin to appear when the lymph vessels become blocked by the cancer cells; the breast typically becomes red, swollen, and warm. The breast skin may appear pitted like an orange peel, and the nipple’s shape may change, causing it to appear dimpled or inverted.

Typically, Inflammatory Breast Cancer grows rapidly and requires aggressive treatment. It may be classified as Stage 3B, 3C, or even Stage 4, depending on your physician’s diagnosis and the results of your biopsy. The treatment most oncologists recommend includes initial chemotherapy followed by a mastectomy and chest wall radiation therapy. The doctor may recommend additional chemotherapy and hormone treatments following radiation.

Related Questions

  • Connie Logan Profile

    Is there anything I can do to stop the bone pain from the neulasta shot? This is my second treatment and it wasn't this bad last time.

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2B Patient
    about 8 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • L D  Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2004

      My oncologist halved my dose which really helped and my numbers were good enough with that.

      Comment
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Yes Erin's right. Those two things helped me a great deal with the bone pain. And I would also soak in a tub of really warm water.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    My sister has been diagnosed with stage 4 breast cancer with metatasis to lung and bone plus skin inflammatory cancer. The doctor has given up on further treatment. How can the family get 2nd opinion and more chemotherapy treatment.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Isabel Souchet Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      You can contact another breast cancer speciality center, one should never give up. There is always hope

      2 comments
    • Donna Ginnings Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2001

      Absolutely never give up. I have been receiving treatment for stage 4 breast cancer for years. There is always hope. I went to MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston TX. They view cancer completely different than most places. May take some time and effort to get an appt but most places take...

      more

      Absolutely never give up. I have been receiving treatment for stage 4 breast cancer for years. There is always hope. I went to MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston TX. They view cancer completely different than most places. May take some time and effort to get an appt but most places take some time to get an appt. If you can't go to md go to any other cancer research or specialty center. DO NOT GIVE UP!!!!! Just guessing, but I bet the dr who has given up is not an oncologist that specializes in breast cancer. There are so many options, but you have to spend the time and effort to get your sister to the right facility. She IS worth it. Healing prayers for your sister.

      1 comment
  • Diana Dale Profile

    What care or treatment do I need after a chemo treatment?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 2 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Yes, as Ali said, all breast cancers are different and treated differently. I had chemo first, then my recent double mastectomy. I was due to begin radiation next but unfortunately I'll have to have more chemo beginning in a couple of days....then radiation. Good luck and God bless you in your...

      more

      Yes, as Ali said, all breast cancers are different and treated differently. I had chemo first, then my recent double mastectomy. I was due to begin radiation next but unfortunately I'll have to have more chemo beginning in a couple of days....then radiation. Good luck and God bless you in your journey Diana.

      Comment
    • Ali S Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Everyone is different b/c all breast cancers are different. I went chemo, lumpectomy, then will have radiation, but some have surgery first

      Comment
  • carol hobday Profile

    My 33 year old daughter was just diagnosed with breast cancer. She was told it was LEVEL 3. When she met with the surgeon today, she was told that the level has to do with how fast the tumor is growing. Is Level 3 the same as Stage 3?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      It sounds as if the level 3 and grade 3 are the same. It is correct in that it indicates how fast or how aggressive the cells are.

      Stage is different and it is an indication of how far along the disease has progressed. Within the stage there are levels A, B, and sometimes C. I was a Stage...

      more

      It sounds as if the level 3 and grade 3 are the same. It is correct in that it indicates how fast or how aggressive the cells are.

      Stage is different and it is an indication of how far along the disease has progressed. Within the stage there are levels A, B, and sometimes C. I was a Stage 2-A, and it went to 2B after my surgery. My grade was 2/3 which meant it was on the aggressive side of cell types. There are also different types of breast cancer, the most common is IDC.
      Please read the information this site has to offer. You can always ask us, we are not doctor's but we can share our personal experience with you or with your daughter. .

      Everybody's treatment protocols are different. It is no longer "one size fits all". Treatments are tailored for what type of cancer cells are found. Usually, it will be 2 to 3 different treatments and or a combo of all. Surgery, Chemotherapy, and radiation. Sadly, breast cancer is so common but the treatments have come a long way. Survival rates have gone up too, thankfully. It's not easy but it is done all the time. Please go with your daughter to her consultation appointment... might not be bad to take a 3rd person along too. So much information is given and your daughter will probably be in shock just from hearing she has breast cancer. Hang in there, your daughter is lucky to have you standing by her side. Take care, Sharon

      2 comments
    • anonymous Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      There is also grades could be grade 3? Did she have a biopsy ? And information should on path report ask dr for copy and to explain.

      Comment

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