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Types & Stages

 
Types & Stages

Chapter: 5 - Types & Stages

Subchapter: 6 - Triple Negative Breast Cancer

In Subchapter 3.1, “Growth of Cancer”, we discussed the role of receptors in cancer cells. Doctors seek to determine what causes certain types of cancer to progress by identifying its “receptors”. These receptors function like mouths: when open, the cancer cells feed and rapidly grow.

Triple Negative Breast Cancer tumors lack receptors for any of three bodily chemicals: estrogen, progesterone, and the HER2/neu gene. There are still effective treatments for it, such as chemotherapy, but doctors are not sure what stimulates this type of tumor to grow.

Women with a family history of breast cancer, specifically with the BRCA1 or BRCA2 breast gene mutation, are more at risk for developing Triple Negative Breast Cancer.

Related Questions

  • Megan Smith Profile

    My mother is having a double mastectomy. Post surgery, what are the advantages of her doing genetic testing? Thanks!

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 8 years 3 answers
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      Hi Megan genetic testing for the BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 are used post surgery as a further test to determine the treatment course. A positive result tells you that you carry the breast cancer gene the doctor might want to be more aggressive with her treatment and maybe suggesting removal of her...

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      Hi Megan genetic testing for the BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 are used post surgery as a further test to determine the treatment course. A positive result tells you that you carry the breast cancer gene the doctor might want to be more aggressive with her treatment and maybe suggesting removal of her ovaries. A positive results will also help the family members male and female siblings and children get better monitoring and screening like earlier mammograms then age 50 or blood test and ultra sounds to screen for ovarian, prostrate and testicular cancers A negative results says that one doesn't carry the breast cancer gene but they are only testing two genes there maybe more that they are unable to test at this time. A positive or negative result does not mean you will or will not get cancer. It is just saying the gene is or is not present.

      Comment
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      There are laws out there to protect you after positive gene testing. If you are having problems contact civil right lawyers in your state. You can google there. Site and in Hawaii there is a link for free help

      Comment
  • Kay Roberts Profile

    Im 46 dx breast cancer HER2. Therapy starts this week. Im so nervous Worried about side effects. Do you remember your very FIRST treatment, What should I expect??? Has anyone found a solution to nausea???

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 3A Patient
    over 7 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Jennifer Jones Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      If you get a bad headache taking Zofran let your Dr. Know. I was allergic to it and had to go on another nausea medicine. Good luck!

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I finished 6 treatments of tc a week ago. I was given zofran before each treatment was started, then I took one zofran that night and then 3 x a day for the next three days. Fortunately, I never had nausea. I was told if the zofran did not work I could take compazine. I was really worried about...

      more

      I finished 6 treatments of tc a week ago. I was given zofran before each treatment was started, then I took one zofran that night and then 3 x a day for the next three days. Fortunately, I never had nausea. I was told if the zofran did not work I could take compazine. I was really worried about side effects but just took and am taking one day (or hour) at a time. I wish you the best.

      Comment
  • Jess G Profile

    I have IDC. My uncle had melanoma and colon cancer. No other family cancer. Does that raise my risk of BRCA 1 and 2?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 8 years 2 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      No, not necessarily. Approx. 75% of women diagnosed with breast cancer have no family history. I have IDC as well and have no family history of cancer. Regardless of that, I do believe it's a good idea for for women with breast cancer to have the BRACA test. I had the test performed and it was...

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      No, not necessarily. Approx. 75% of women diagnosed with breast cancer have no family history. I have IDC as well and have no family history of cancer. Regardless of that, I do believe it's a good idea for for women with breast cancer to have the BRACA test. I had the test performed and it was negative.

      Comment
    • Laura Cornwell Profile
      anonymous
      Industry Provider

      BRCA 1 and 2 are uncommon mutations. Only 2-3% of women with breast cancer have them. However, it is useful to know if you have the gene in your family because their risk of getting breast cancer in their lifetime is 60%, as compared to 18% for someone without the mutation. Doctors use the...

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      BRCA 1 and 2 are uncommon mutations. Only 2-3% of women with breast cancer have them. However, it is useful to know if you have the gene in your family because their risk of getting breast cancer in their lifetime is 60%, as compared to 18% for someone without the mutation. Doctors use the following aid to assist in their decisions to test for the mutation.

      https://www.myriadpro.com/brca-risk-calculator

      The predictions rely strongly on breast cancer family history <50 years of age, and strong family history of breast and ovarian cancers (and also prostate in male relatives).

      Comment
  • Sarah Foster Profile

    My mom is HER2 positive. Is there a test that I can have done to see if I am a carrier?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 2 answers
    • Mary Foti Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      I am sorry about your mom's diagnosis. If you decide to get genetic testing, make sure you see a genetic counselor and/or a geneticist and ask that doctor if you are a candidate for BART testing. The genetic testing process is more complex than most people think. Your geneticist can explain the...

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      I am sorry about your mom's diagnosis. If you decide to get genetic testing, make sure you see a genetic counselor and/or a geneticist and ask that doctor if you are a candidate for BART testing. The genetic testing process is more complex than most people think. Your geneticist can explain the different available tests. There is "basic" testing and BART testing. My mother, who has fought breast cancer 3 times, tested BRCA negative after her first diagnosis in 2006 but she in fact really wasn't. (She only had the "basic" test). When I was diagnosed in 2010, I consulted a geneticist with enough brains to order BART genetic testing for me, which confirmed I have a BRCA2 mutation. My mother was re-tested and is also positive. Several cousins were subsequently tested and are also positive. If I hadn't had the BART test, they would not have known. Genetic testing is a scary process but it can give you and your family potentially life-saving information.

      3 comments
    • Becky G Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      Yes. It's the BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 genetic test to see if you carry the breast cancer gene. Having the gene doesn't necessarily mean you will get breast cancer, but it may increase your chances and give you information to take care of yourself and be proactive.
      Here is some information from...

      more

      Yes. It's the BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 genetic test to see if you carry the breast cancer gene. Having the gene doesn't necessarily mean you will get breast cancer, but it may increase your chances and give you information to take care of yourself and be proactive.
      Here is some information from www.breastcenter.com on the test:
      In 1994, the first gene associated with breast cancer — BRCA1 (for BReast CAncer1) was identified on chromosome 17. A year later, a second gene associated with breast cancer — BRCA2 — was discovered on chromosome 13. When individuals carry a mutated form of either BRCA1 or BRCA2, they have an increased risk of developing breast or ovarian cancer at some point in their lives. Children of parents with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation have a 50 percent chance of inheriting the gene mutation.

      Your Mom's doctor would probably be able to refer you to a genetic counselor to have the test done. They do take a sample of your spit instead of a blood test now. It's an easy test to take, but can cost quite a bit (fyi).

      Hope that helps!

      Good luck and all the best to your Mom!!!

      Comment

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