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Types & Stages

 
Types & Stages

Chapter: 5 - Types & Stages

Subchapter: 2 - Stage 0 & 1

Stage 0
Stage 0, DCIS (Ductal Carcinoma in Situ) is a noninvasive cancer where abnormal cells have been found in the lining of the breast milk duct.

Even though Stage 0 cancer is still noninvasive, it does require immediate treatment and is typically treated with surgery or radiation, or a combination of the two. Chemotherapy is not part of the treatment regimen for earlier stages of cancer.

Stage 1
In Stage 1 invasive breast cancer, the tumor has not exceeded 2cm (0.8in). Although it’s considered to be invasive, it has not yet spread to any surrounding lymph nodes or outside the breast tissue.

Related Questions

  • Shelley Zipp Profile

    I just found out I have triple negative breast cancer, a form of invasive ductal carcinoma - stage 1 1.3cmm tumor, very small, but still requires llumpectomy, chemo, then radiation. What's the recovery time after a lumpectomy?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 3 answers
    • Sarah Adams Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      Has your doctor tested you for the BRCA gene mutation? If not, I would suggest doing that before moving forward with him/her. Triple negative breast cancer is most often associated with the BRCA gene mutation & if you happen to have it, you may be advised to do more than a lumpectomy. I'm no...

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      Has your doctor tested you for the BRCA gene mutation? If not, I would suggest doing that before moving forward with him/her. Triple negative breast cancer is most often associated with the BRCA gene mutation & if you happen to have it, you may be advised to do more than a lumpectomy. I'm no doctor...it's just a suggestion. I'd get a second opinion, anyway. :) Wishing you the best!

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hello - you know lumpectomies can vary enomormusly in size and location, as can the number and type of stitches required. All that as well as your general health and other complications such as infection means the recovery rate can vary significantly from person to person. I was discharged around...

      more

      Hello - you know lumpectomies can vary enomormusly in size and location, as can the number and type of stitches required. All that as well as your general health and other complications such as infection means the recovery rate can vary significantly from person to person. I was discharged around 16 hours after the operation. I had to stay overnight because of bad reaction to general anesthetic + I was a late in the day operation. I had about 57grams removed from my right inner upper quadrant and I had double stitching [underneath as well as on top]. It took about a week for the special bandages to fall off naturally. I was back doing 90 minute yoga class within a few days of the lumpectomy, so on one level it was a fast recovery BUT I needed some physiotherapy to restore my right arm mobility to about 95% of what it was - that was caused by the sentinel node biopsy though, not the lumpectomy. Many women I have spoken to say they experience more problems from the sentinel node biopsy rather than the lumpectomy. The lumpectomy is a fat removal essentially whereas the sentinel node biopsy is close to a lot of nerves and pathways and muscles so this is not unexpected.

      Comment
  • Joan Wehner Profile

    When you develop lymphodima in your arm, after a mastectomy, will it be permanent?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 3 answers
    • anonymous Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Hi Joan,
      I am a 4 year survivor of breast cancer. I had partial mastectomy and 17 lymph nodes removed from under my right arm followed by radiation and chemo. I did not develop noticeable lymphedema for about 2 years after my treatments. I started treatment with Lymphapress machine and an...

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      Hi Joan,
      I am a 4 year survivor of breast cancer. I had partial mastectomy and 17 lymph nodes removed from under my right arm followed by radiation and chemo. I did not develop noticeable lymphedema for about 2 years after my treatments. I started treatment with Lymphapress machine and an over the counter compression sleeve. This did not work very well and I eventually started manual lymphatic drainage (MLD) with a Registered Massage Therapist and I got a custom fitted sleeve. This has made a noticeable difference in the size of my arm within just a few weeks.

      I was told by several doctors and by my massage therapist that lymphedema cannot be cured, but you can keep it under control if you get the proper treatment and do the exercises. I would see if you can find a massage therapist or physiotherapist who is trained in either the Foldi or Vodder method of MLD.

      Good luck with your treatment, and I will be thinking of you.

      Comment
    • Deborah Goessling Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      I had all the lymph nodes removed under one arm. About a year later, I experienced lymphedema that was successfully reversed. I don't know if this applies to all cases. My lymphedema was so mild that I didn't notice it. It was detected with the help of an L-Dex machine; otherwise, i wouldn't have...

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      I had all the lymph nodes removed under one arm. About a year later, I experienced lymphedema that was successfully reversed. I don't know if this applies to all cases. My lymphedema was so mild that I didn't notice it. It was detected with the help of an L-Dex machine; otherwise, i wouldn't have known I had it. After it was detected, the nurse practitioner (at my breast surgeon's office) instructed me to wear a compression sleeve for the next 8 weeks. I went beyond that and added back the exercising I had grown lax about doing. I re-started my jogging and weight-lifting programs. I always wore my sleeve while doing these things, and I read about how to do them safely. (For example, with weight-lifting start SLOWLY and increase GRADUALLY. Get plenty of rest between sets when weight-lifting. You might want to do one set for your arms and then alternate with a set for your legs so that your arm has more time to recover than when you follow a standard program. There are books and articles with good tips like this. I read up on it.) Anyway, after going 2 months wearing my sleeve all day PLUS resuming the exercising (jogging & weight-lifting) I had been slacking off on, my L-Dex scores went back to normal. I was told I no longer had lymphedema and could stop wearing the sleeve other than when I exercise. (I always wear it when I exercise.) This is just one case, and my lymphedema was MILD. So i don't know if this answer will help you.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I have stage one estrogen positive breast cancer. What is the prognosis?

    Asked by anonymous

    about 8 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Connie Herrick Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Your prognosis should be very good. What does your doctor say? Have you had any treatment yet? How old are you?

      I was diagnosed with Stage 2A breast cancer last April. I was also estrogen positive, and the tumor was fast-growing. I had a lumpectomy, and the tumor size was 3 centimeters. I...

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      Your prognosis should be very good. What does your doctor say? Have you had any treatment yet? How old are you?

      I was diagnosed with Stage 2A breast cancer last April. I was also estrogen positive, and the tumor was fast-growing. I had a lumpectomy, and the tumor size was 3 centimeters. I had 2 lymph nodes removed, and they were negative. So I had 4 chemo treatments, and 33 radiation treatments. Both were very tolerable. I am now on an estrogen-blocking pill that I will take for 5 years, since estrogen feeds breast cancer, this will help lessen my chances of it coming back. I plan to live to a ripe old age! I try to eat healthy and get plenty of exercise.

      Comment
    • Lori Murray Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hi!
      I have/had estrogen positive also, from what I understand it is one of the very treatable forms. Mine is actually stage 4 since it went to a "tiny" area of my sternum which was radiated and now clear:)...my treatment is working very well and my scans have been clear since I started. I had...

      more

      Hi!
      I have/had estrogen positive also, from what I understand it is one of the very treatable forms. Mine is actually stage 4 since it went to a "tiny" area of my sternum which was radiated and now clear:)...my treatment is working very well and my scans have been clear since I started. I had my ovaries shut down with a lupron injection,eventually removed. I also take letrozole which stops any other estrogen that may be around. I am doing very well now, I think you have great hope...hang in there and try and take it step by step...it is a lot of information to process at once...Be well...xx

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    What stage when I have bloody discharge from nipple changed shape along with rash/bruise on breast also lumps near arm pit and lost a lot of weight very painful

    Asked by anonymous

    over 5 years 3 answers
    • Lou Cam Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Marianne is right. The first step is biopsy, but your pathology report after surgery will tell you the things that Marianne mentioned, and these results determine your stage , as well as your treatment plan.

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      You need to be diagnosed first. The type, size, grade, and lymph node involvement determine your stage.

      Comment

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