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Types & Stages

 
Types & Stages

Chapter: 5 - Types & Stages

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

We will now cover the five stages of breast cancer and what to expect from each stage.

Cancer is assessed by stages ranging from 0-4; each stage represents a progression of the cancer. As the complexity of the cancer intensifies, so does the treatment required to fight it. Breast cancer is assigned to a stage based on where it began in the breast and how much of the breast and other parts of the body are affected by it.

Remember, the stage of cancer is separate from the tumor grade, which we discussed in Subchapter 3.2.

We will also review the types of cancer. First, covering the more common types of breast cancer, but also the unusual diagnoses like triple negative breast cancer, inflammatory breast cancer, and cancer during pregnancy.

Your responsibility, as discussed in Chapter 4, is to develop a support team, of family or friends, that will comfort and encourage you in this time.

Related Questions

  • susan Richmond Profile

    Any of you ladies been diagnosed with stage 4 I DC ?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Paula McLaughlin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      Susan--I had two different primary tumors in the same breast (with 8years in between). Both tumors were small and Stage I IDC. Last year, a CT scan showed that the cancer had spread to my AP

      Comment
    • Paula McLaughlin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      Oops--pressed a wrong button...anyhow, the second cancer spread to my spine so now, I have stage IV breast cancer metastases. It's very scary, of course, yet there are many effective treatments available. There's every reason to hope for quality of life and years to enjoy that life. I had a...

      more

      Oops--pressed a wrong button...anyhow, the second cancer spread to my spine so now, I have stage IV breast cancer metastases. It's very scary, of course, yet there are many effective treatments available. There's every reason to hope for quality of life and years to enjoy that life. I had a mastectomy on the right side and get monthly injections that have made the lesions in my spine become stable. Everyone's cancer is unique and requires u ique

      Comment
  • Mona Assadi Profile

    I'm 26 and I have been diagnosed with stage 2. Do I need a mastectomy??

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 3 answers
    • Tiffani Warila Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I am 29 and based on the Size of the lump during ultrasound am borderline stage 1-2. I am doing 8 rounds of chemo before surgery in hopes of shrinking the tumor. Then only a lumpectomy will be needed. There are many different factors to consider though. Genetic testing to see if you are brca1 or...

      more

      I am 29 and based on the Size of the lump during ultrasound am borderline stage 1-2. I am doing 8 rounds of chemo before surgery in hopes of shrinking the tumor. Then only a lumpectomy will be needed. There are many different factors to consider though. Genetic testing to see if you are brca1 or brca2 positive, if there is more than one tumor, etc. Your doctor would be able to tell you if chemo first would be a good option for you. If you have any other questions feel free to ask me. I am more than willing to to help!

      Comment
    • Joan Rosov Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 3A Patient

      I have had breast cancer twice. Both times I had genetic testing The results really helped in the decision process.

      Comment
  • Shelley Zipp Profile

    I just found out I have triple negative breast cancer, a form of invasive ductal carcinoma - stage 1 1.3cmm tumor, very small, but still requires llumpectomy, chemo, then radiation. What's the recovery time after a lumpectomy?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 3 answers
    • Sarah Adams Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      Has your doctor tested you for the BRCA gene mutation? If not, I would suggest doing that before moving forward with him/her. Triple negative breast cancer is most often associated with the BRCA gene mutation & if you happen to have it, you may be advised to do more than a lumpectomy. I'm no...

      more

      Has your doctor tested you for the BRCA gene mutation? If not, I would suggest doing that before moving forward with him/her. Triple negative breast cancer is most often associated with the BRCA gene mutation & if you happen to have it, you may be advised to do more than a lumpectomy. I'm no doctor...it's just a suggestion. I'd get a second opinion, anyway. :) Wishing you the best!

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hello - you know lumpectomies can vary enomormusly in size and location, as can the number and type of stitches required. All that as well as your general health and other complications such as infection means the recovery rate can vary significantly from person to person. I was discharged around...

      more

      Hello - you know lumpectomies can vary enomormusly in size and location, as can the number and type of stitches required. All that as well as your general health and other complications such as infection means the recovery rate can vary significantly from person to person. I was discharged around 16 hours after the operation. I had to stay overnight because of bad reaction to general anesthetic + I was a late in the day operation. I had about 57grams removed from my right inner upper quadrant and I had double stitching [underneath as well as on top]. It took about a week for the special bandages to fall off naturally. I was back doing 90 minute yoga class within a few days of the lumpectomy, so on one level it was a fast recovery BUT I needed some physiotherapy to restore my right arm mobility to about 95% of what it was - that was caused by the sentinel node biopsy though, not the lumpectomy. Many women I have spoken to say they experience more problems from the sentinel node biopsy rather than the lumpectomy. The lumpectomy is a fat removal essentially whereas the sentinel node biopsy is close to a lot of nerves and pathways and muscles so this is not unexpected.

      Comment
  • Alice Eisele Profile

    What is the prognosis for metastatic Stage 4 Breast Cancer that has spread to the lung?

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2009
    over 7 years 1 answer
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Nobody can say for sure. There are women who have all sorts of diagnosis's and have all sorts of different outcomes. I think one just gets the best advice, goes into treatment and lives each day they best they can. I always say you can get hit by a bus.... tomorrow!
      I think doctor's tend to be...

      more

      Nobody can say for sure. There are women who have all sorts of diagnosis's and have all sorts of different outcomes. I think one just gets the best advice, goes into treatment and lives each day they best they can. I always say you can get hit by a bus.... tomorrow!
      I think doctor's tend to be more hopeful, they have so many different kinds of treatment and there are also drug studies you can enroll in. Lots of times, these treatments will make these spots on lungs shrink if not disappear. I also think along with good treatment, a fighting spirit and positive attitude will bring you a long, long way. I would hope your doctor does not fill your head with anything other than a positive hopeful attitude. You GO GIRL! Hang in there!!! Sharon

      2 comments

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