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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Carla Victor-rawson Profile

    What is "normal" swelling after surgery and what type of swelling is bad that needs to be felt with?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 3 answers
    • Cathy Wadkins Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Well you have issues of fluid, and swelling of tissues but it is normal

      Comment
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      Carla swelling that needs to be dealt with is angry red and hot very very sensitive. The incision maybe a little red at the incision line if that reddness continues to spread and the area gets Warmer and warmer to touch and if you get a fever (if you are taking pain meds you may not get a high...

      more

      Carla swelling that needs to be dealt with is angry red and hot very very sensitive. The incision maybe a little red at the incision line if that reddness continues to spread and the area gets Warmer and warmer to touch and if you get a fever (if you are taking pain meds you may not get a high fever ) It is okay to call your doctor if you are concerned if your doctor is unavailable you can also call the surgical center/ hospital you had your procedure done at or the emergency room and ask to talk to a nurse.

      Comment
  • Kay K Profile

    If my mom had breast cancer, will I most likely get it?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 1 answer
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      No. My mom had breast cancer, and it's something I think about a lot. So far, I don't and none of her sisters have been diagnosed. Your chances do increase if your mother, sister, or daughter has been diagnosed with breast cancer, but it's definitely not a guarantee you will get it. I think a...

      more

      No. My mom had breast cancer, and it's something I think about a lot. So far, I don't and none of her sisters have been diagnosed. Your chances do increase if your mother, sister, or daughter has been diagnosed with breast cancer, but it's definitely not a guarantee you will get it. I think a lot of it depends on if you carry the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene. You may want to ask your doctor about getting tested for this if you have a family history. Hope this helps!

      Comment
  • Nikki De France Lucas Profile

    I'm 3 weeks post mastectomy and my arm and armpit swelling is worse and still alot of numbness in the same area anyone else have this experience? I'm scheduled for physcial thearpy and possibly a sleeve tomorrow..feeling like recovery is going backwards

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 9 answers
    • View all 9 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      I had a double mastectomy in June. I still have numbness and at times a burning like tingling under my armpit (kind if my upper side area) and sometimes my arm feels heavy. I saw a physical therapist who says I don't have Lymphedema. I do however have this annoying cord thing that goes thru my...

      more

      I had a double mastectomy in June. I still have numbness and at times a burning like tingling under my armpit (kind if my upper side area) and sometimes my arm feels heavy. I saw a physical therapist who says I don't have Lymphedema. I do however have this annoying cord thing that goes thru my armpit. Therapist said it will eventually pop or dissolve. My aunt had a mastectomy with lymph node removal 13 years ago and said she still has numb areas. I think it's just part of the whole procedure. Nerve endings were removed, maybe some don't repair. Good luck.

      1 comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I had a mastectomy on August 27 two months later I started noticing swelling in my arm and I unfortunately got Lympadema on my right arm because of the removal of 16 of my lymph nodes. I'm doing therapy now it's supposed to help bed but from what I understand it's not something that goes away...

      more

      I had a mastectomy on August 27 two months later I started noticing swelling in my arm and I unfortunately got Lympadema on my right arm because of the removal of 16 of my lymph nodes. I'm doing therapy now it's supposed to help bed but from what I understand it's not something that goes away ever...God is yet good

      2 comments
  • Holly Stroup Profile

    How many people are diagnosed with breast cancer every year in the state of Arizona?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years Answer

Educational Video

Personal Story

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