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    View real video stories from people that have been diagnosed, received treatment, and survived breast cancer.

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  • michelle  laflamme  Profile

    Bilateral breast cancer. Are there any survivors here? I was diagnosed 1/31 on left. Follow up studies showed right sided disease. I had a double mastectomy2/25 no reconstruction. I just turned 50 in April.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 21 hours 1 answer
    • Rachelle W Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2014

      Hello and yes!. This year will be my 6th year anniversary "No evidence of disease." I was diagnosed in July of 2014 Stage 1a. I was 41 when diagnosed and now 47. I had a bilateral mastectomy and reconstruction, 12 weeks of chemo, and 1 year therapy drug given intravenously. My mom had...

      more

      Hello and yes!. This year will be my 6th year anniversary "No evidence of disease." I was diagnosed in July of 2014 Stage 1a. I was 41 when diagnosed and now 47. I had a bilateral mastectomy and reconstruction, 12 weeks of chemo, and 1 year therapy drug given intravenously. My mom had breast cancer in her late 50's and now my aunt who is almost 80 just got diagnosed.

      Comment
  • Jennifer  Orsborne  Profile

    Recommendations on caring for my skin during radiation treatments

    Asked by anonymous

    stage_2b Patient
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Every place has what they prefer you to use, I was told before my first treatment. I used pure aloe vera gel at my place's recommendations. Just be sure that no matter what you use don't apply it right before your treatment or from I've heard it may cause burns.

      Comment
    • michelle  laflamme  Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I finished radiation yesterday. i used calendula 4 times per day and aquaphor at night. Miaderma is superior because it is water based but more expensive. I had some folliculitis, i had a double mastectomy when that ocurred I used hydrocortisone on that area. good luck i know it is scary.

      Comment
  • michelle Birdwell Profile

    Does anyone know treatment for lobular carcinoma

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    5 days 2 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Everyone's cancer is unique to them even with the same diagnosis as yours. Therefore treatments are individualized. Your team needs to be discussing your treatment plan with you. Take care, Betti

      Comment
    • Rachelle W Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2014

      A lot will depend on the testing they do on the cancer cells. If they come back Estrogen (ER), Progesterone (PR), and/or HER2 positive, that will determine your course for treatment. And the grade is another factor too.

      Comment
  • Betti A Profile

    port removal time

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2013
    5 days 1 answer
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Well, I've had my port for 7 years and go in every 6 weeks and get it flushed. It has never been an issue until last week. They got it accessed but got no blood return. They tried several things but nothing worked. I ended up getting a dose of a clot busting med. into the port and sat for an...

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      Well, I've had my port for 7 years and go in every 6 weeks and get it flushed. It has never been an issue until last week. They got it accessed but got no blood return. They tried several things but nothing worked. I ended up getting a dose of a clot busting med. into the port and sat for an hour. At the end of the hour still no blood so I'd have to sit another hour when the nurse noted some blood in the line. They aspirated some blood and thought it may contain some small clots. I decided that perhaps it's time to have it removed and my Onc. ARNP agreed with me. She sent a referral to an Interventional Radiology clinic to look into getting it out. I assume they will call Monday as the referral was sent late to them on Friday. I hoped to have it forever but guess God felt now is the time to get rid of it.

      2 comments
  • Thumb avatar default

    If a woman did her mammogram in 2019 when will she go back for another one? No cancers in herself or family age 66

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    13 days 1 answer
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      The last time I knew (unless guidelines have changed) at age 66 a woman needs a study annually unless something new comes up as in changes to the breasts. I had an annual study starting at age 50 with no family history and yet developed cancer 2 months after my 62nd BD. Make sure and do your...

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      The last time I knew (unless guidelines have changed) at age 66 a woman needs a study annually unless something new comes up as in changes to the breasts. I had an annual study starting at age 50 with no family history and yet developed cancer 2 months after my 62nd BD. Make sure and do your monthly checks and have a doctor do an exam once a year.

      1 comment
  • Lila Grace Profile

    Has anyone ever met someone, or heard of someone get told by their radiologist that their lump is a BIRADS 5, but then later on the biopsy results came back negative? Meaning that the radiologist mis-categorized the lump before doing the biopsy?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    14 days 1 answer
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      What I was trying to say is cancerous lumps seen on a mammogram usually look different from benign findings but not always. When I had a yearly mammogram back in Dec. of 2012 2 new areas were seen next to each other that hadn't been seen the year before so it was enough to be called back for...

      more

      What I was trying to say is cancerous lumps seen on a mammogram usually look different from benign findings but not always. When I had a yearly mammogram back in Dec. of 2012 2 new areas were seen next to each other that hadn't been seen the year before so it was enough to be called back for additional images and U/S. The results went from a BiRads 0 to a BiRads 4. It turns out I had 2 areas of 2 different types of cancer. In the surgical specimen 2 additional areas were seen; one being the same as one of the areas we biopsied and the other a 3rd different type of cancer. None of mine produced lumps it was just changes seen since the one a year earlier. I'm sorry if I upset you with what I wrote earlier.

      8 comments
  • Lila Grace Profile

    Has anyone ever heard of BIRADS 5 turning out not to be cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    15 days 1 answer
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      BiRads 5 simply means it looks like cancer on your mammogram as it has certain characteristics. The only way to determine if it is indeed cancer is to do a biopsy. I used to be a mammographer and it only went to 5 but they have added a 6 now meaning it is cancer already known (having had a...

      more

      BiRads 5 simply means it looks like cancer on your mammogram as it has certain characteristics. The only way to determine if it is indeed cancer is to do a biopsy. I used to be a mammographer and it only went to 5 but they have added a 6 now meaning it is cancer already known (having had a biopsy and it's known to have found cancer.

      1 comment
  • Loni Fazio Profile

    My cousin has just finished her treatment. She has had a double mastectomy, chemo and radiation, and she is making herself sick to her stomach with worry and anxiety about still having cancer; she does not feel closure..her words. How do I help her?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    16 days 1 answer
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Do you live close by? Perhaps check and see if there is a support group in her area. We all worry it may come back and pray it doesn't. Stress won't be her friend so she needs to try and relax.

      Comment
  • Crystal Kimmel Profile

    Today I started radiation treatments for my breast cancer, when do the side effects start and what can I expect?

    Asked by anonymous

    stage_1 Patient
    24 days 2 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Everyone is different. Some people have some fatigue. My chest and axilla were radiated, both areas turned bright red (like a sunburn). Some people have the skin break down, have blisters, etc. I feel blessed I didn't have major issues. My RT normally would have prescribed an antibiotic...

      more

      Everyone is different. Some people have some fatigue. My chest and axilla were radiated, both areas turned bright red (like a sunburn). Some people have the skin break down, have blisters, etc. I feel blessed I didn't have major issues. My RT normally would have prescribed an antibiotic cream for the last couple of weeks but I'm allergic to the main ingredient and since my skin was intact he opted not to have me use it. Every clinic will recommend what to put on the area radiated (I used pure aloe vera gel) and put some on afterwards and before bedtime.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Please suggest support groups that cam help answer questions regarding Her2 breast cancer. IS THERE ANY ONE OUT THERE THAT HAS SURVIVED THIS TYPE OF BREAST CANCER?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    26 days 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Fatema Dedat Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I had HER2 cancer in May 2011
      How can I help

      Comment
    • Jill M. Profile
      anonymous
      stage_2a Patient

      My breast cancer was HER2 positive.
      I’m 7 years out with no recurrence. How can I help?

      1 comment
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