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Penny's Story

About her story

"I knew I had to take this horrible, bad thing and turn it in to something positive."

In March 2010, Penny was diagnosed with Stage IIB Triple-negative breast cancer.

"There's something about when you've been diagnosed with breast cancer, it's like being elected to a club that you never wanted to be a part of," says Penny. "But, when you're there, you're really glad there's other people with you."

A busy salon owner, Penny realized that her diagnosis and treatment would completely change her lifestyle. But, through breast cancer, she learned that it was her family and support that meant most to her.

Watch Penny's story and learn how a rare form of breast cancer changed her life and helped her realize that all things work out for good in the end.

Related Questions

  • jan bursky Profile

    Has anyone had invasive lobular cancer metastasize despite mastectomy and chemo? Stage 3 and loss of lymph nodes are involved. Very scary.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      10 years ago, my best friend had stage 4 Invasive Lobular Breast Cancer. She had 4 rounds of AC before a mastectomy and complete axillary removal of nodes. 17 out of 21 nodes were positive. She was scheduled for different chemo treatments but would only allow radiation. After the radiation,...

      more

      10 years ago, my best friend had stage 4 Invasive Lobular Breast Cancer. She had 4 rounds of AC before a mastectomy and complete axillary removal of nodes. 17 out of 21 nodes were positive. She was scheduled for different chemo treatments but would only allow radiation. After the radiation, she refused any other treatment. She lived for 5 years until it metastisized to her bone marrow. She passed away just as I found out I had breast cancer. She said she'd lived long enough and died at age 64. It still upsets me that she gave up the fight before she had even begun. It was her life and her decision but her loss left a big hole in the hearts of many people. Sharon

      Comment
    • Patricia Stoop Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Oh prayers for you. Very scary. I had liver masses too and found meditation a great help!

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Does anyone have any advice or suggestions for treating a headache? I had my first of four AC treatments Thursday and there's been a nonstop headache since then.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 3 answers
    • vicki e Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2B Patient

      Ask your doc for something for the headaches if OTC stuff is not working. Some chemos cause that side effect and if so, the OTC stuff may not work. Don't suffer through it. You don't want to do that and your chemo team doesn't either, so ask. Also be sure to drink lots of fluids because...

      more

      Ask your doc for something for the headaches if OTC stuff is not working. Some chemos cause that side effect and if so, the OTC stuff may not work. Don't suffer through it. You don't want to do that and your chemo team doesn't either, so ask. Also be sure to drink lots of fluids because dehydration will contribute to headaches as well. Good luck to u

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Sometimes it is the anti nausea meds. I was so worried about nausea that I think I took too much of the anti nausea stuff which causes the headache. Try to back off from the ... Can't remember the name. Gas... Something in a green packet. Bad headaches with that one.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    My mother had bilateral mastectomy last week and has had fevers ever since. Her white blood cell count is at 47? Is that bad? Going in for her 3rd surgery today.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 2 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I am sorry but do not know what is normal for blood counts but if she is running a fever, that does not sound good to me. This is something she needs to talk to her surgeon about asap. It also sounds like she may need to be on some kind of antibiotic.
      Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Evelyn Heilbrunn Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      A normal white blood cell count is around 10,000. I assume your mom's is 47,000. With a high white cell count and a fever it sounds like your mom has an infection going on. (I was a nurse in a former life.) She needs to reach out to her doctors ASAP.
      If she can't reach them, and depending...

      more

      A normal white blood cell count is around 10,000. I assume your mom's is 47,000. With a high white cell count and a fever it sounds like your mom has an infection going on. (I was a nurse in a former life.) She needs to reach out to her doctors ASAP.
      If she can't reach them, and depending on how bad she feels, you might want to consider going to the ER at a hospital with which her doctor is affiliated. Be sure she wears a mask (you can get one at a drug store). She probably needs to have blood work and other tests to figure out what's going on.
      Keep us posted, and please continue to ask any questions you might have.

      2 comments
  • Thumb avatar default

    Is it usual to still have a low White Blood Cell count 4 1/2 weeks after last chemo ( 4th T/C) ?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Doesn't your onc take blood before you infusian? Mine got low after #4 but never got to the point I couldn't have 5&6. I did TC.

      2 comments
    • Lisa G Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Yes infact I couldn't get my 2nd surgery done because of it. It takes awhile for them come back up. Hang there

      Comment
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