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Patsy's Story

About her story

"I know the feeling that you must be having if you've just been diagnosed or you have a loved one that's just been diagnosed with breast cancer."

In February 2002, Patsy discovered a lump and scheduled a mammogram with her doctor. The doctor performed a biopsy and diagnosed Patsy with Stage 2 breast cancer.

Patsy described her diagnosis, "like lightening had hit me. I was knocked to the ground."
But, like so many, Patsy relied on the strength of her family and friends to look at the hope in each day and to overcome breast cancer.

Hear Patsy's story and learn how she was not alone in her diagnosis.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    How long is the recovery after a unilateral expander is replaced with an implant? And what can I expect?

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2011
    over 6 years 1 answer
    • Donna Gray Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I had my saline implants put in in August of 2011. I am still recovering. No pain except nerves regenerating. It's like a burning itchy feeling. You will feeling more normal everyday. I should say your new normal. Just take it one day at a time because everyone is different. God Bless you.

      Comment
  • blanca ayala Profile

    I'm new to the group. Diagnosed with L BC on 4/12/12. Will have bilateral on 7/17/12. I'm not sure how and what to feel. It's like me looking at someone else. Is that fair?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 6 years 8 answers
    • View all 8 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Hi Blanca, I had the same reaction. From the time the surgeon looked down at me as he bandaged my biopsy site and told me he was almost positive it was cancer, I felt like I woke up in someone elses' reality. I became a calm observer-it was almost a spiritual out of body exsperience. In some way...

      more

      Hi Blanca, I had the same reaction. From the time the surgeon looked down at me as he bandaged my biopsy site and told me he was almost positive it was cancer, I felt like I woke up in someone elses' reality. I became a calm observer-it was almost a spiritual out of body exsperience. In some way I feel like it was a strange way of my mind trying to protect me or a gift from God to get me through the shock. After my surgery, things began to sort themselves out with my medical team and that weird feeling became a part of the history of my journey. This numb foreign feeling will pass as you work with your team to plan your way back to health. Take heart and know there are many women whose hearts go out to you tonight. Welcome to the beginning of your journey to wellness. :-D Jo

      2 comments
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      So sorry you have to join our group BUT we are a very strong group of people. I am glad you found us please stay in touch. I finished active treatment a year ago. I just had a bi lat mastectomy a week ago. It has not been as bad as I expected. It is a crazy time either take a spouse, sister,...

      more

      So sorry you have to join our group BUT we are a very strong group of people. I am glad you found us please stay in touch. I finished active treatment a year ago. I just had a bi lat mastectomy a week ago. It has not been as bad as I expected. It is a crazy time either take a spouse, sister, friend, etc with you to every appointment to help you listen and ask questions. God bless you on your journey reach out whenever you need us.

      Comment
  • anonymous Profile

    Should I be more concerned because I'm scheduled to have ultrasound-guided biopsy AND stereotactic-guided biopsy on 2 areas of my left breast? I'm worried that means my chances are now doubled.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 1 year 2 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      I had the same; one was easier to see with U/S and the other better done stereotactically. Actually the Radiologist captured a piece of the 2nd area not normally seen with U/S during the U/S guided biopsy. It doesn't mean your "chances" are doubled by any means.

      4 comments
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      It is so scary to be face with a biopsy. Be very happy your doctor was proactive! From your point of view, in the area of the biopsy, your breast will be numbed with something similar to what your dentist uses. You will feel a poke, some stinging, to make the area numb. Once that is...

      more

      It is so scary to be face with a biopsy. Be very happy your doctor was proactive! From your point of view, in the area of the biopsy, your breast will be numbed with something similar to what your dentist uses. You will feel a poke, some stinging, to make the area numb. Once that is accomplished, you will feel pressure from the biopsy needle being guided to the proper area. Some cells will be extracted to be sent to a lab. Again from your point of view, the procedure will be the same, it is just the radiologist is using a different method of viewing the suspicious area. You will be told to put ice/cold on the area. You may have some discomfort after the numbness wears off. Follow the aftercare instructions. As far as I am concerned, the waiting for the results is the real torture. Many more of these biopsy's turn out to be non-cancerous. My radiologist told me from the get-go to expect a diagnosis of cancer. She was right. That was 9 years ago, I am healthy an lead a normal life. Hang in there and take care, Sharon

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    ok, Iam a 69 yr old who was told today that my biopsy was Invasive Ductal carcinoma, 5 cm. I will got to see the surgeon next Tuesday. I'll get the receptor results then. 5 cm seems awfully large. Has anyone on here had one that large?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 1 year 8 answers
    • View all 8 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      It's pretty big but don't be terrified! LOTS of tumors that a much larger. Treatment will probably start out with chemotherapy to shrink the tumor. You are probably going to be headed for a bunch of testing first before treatment begins. There are many options for treatment that allow us to go...

      more

      It's pretty big but don't be terrified! LOTS of tumors that a much larger. Treatment will probably start out with chemotherapy to shrink the tumor. You are probably going to be headed for a bunch of testing first before treatment begins. There are many options for treatment that allow us to go on living a normal life following treatment. Hang in there, you will be ok. Take care, Sharon

      1 comment
    • Chickie Allemand Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I am the one who asked the question. IT was asked before I joined. Thanks to all who is,giving me hope.
      Love

      Comment

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