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Patsy's Story

About her story

"I know the feeling that you must be having if you've just been diagnosed or you have a loved one that's just been diagnosed with breast cancer."

In February 2002, Patsy discovered a lump and scheduled a mammogram with her doctor. The doctor performed a biopsy and diagnosed Patsy with Stage 2 breast cancer.

Patsy described her diagnosis, "like lightening had hit me. I was knocked to the ground."
But, like so many, Patsy relied on the strength of her family and friends to look at the hope in each day and to overcome breast cancer.

Hear Patsy's story and learn how she was not alone in her diagnosis.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    Can breast cancer be known for sure without a biopsy?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 3 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      As far as I know, this is the only definitive way of diagnosing for breast cancer. With that biopsy, a lot can be shown such as what type of breast cancer, and what the preliminary stage is. With that information, a treatment plan can be started. I know of no other way that would actually be...

      more

      As far as I know, this is the only definitive way of diagnosing for breast cancer. With that biopsy, a lot can be shown such as what type of breast cancer, and what the preliminary stage is. With that information, a treatment plan can be started. I know of no other way that would actually be able to examine the cells to see if cancer is present.
      Take care, Sharon

      4 comments
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      The only definite way to diagnose any type of cancer is with some sort of biopsy.... Blood test may give clues an may rule out other diagnosis. But a biopsy takes you right to the source and the specimen can be dissected under a microscope. A mammogram/ ultrasound /scan/MRI/even PET scan can...

      more

      The only definite way to diagnose any type of cancer is with some sort of biopsy.... Blood test may give clues an may rule out other diagnosis. But a biopsy takes you right to the source and the specimen can be dissected under a microscope. A mammogram/ ultrasound /scan/MRI/even PET scan can only point out a suspicious area or hot spot all wonderful diagnostic tools that usually lead up to a biopsy if something is found suspicious

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I had a 1cm breast tumor, stage 1, two lymph nodes removed ten days ago that doctor said looked good. I am 72 and in excellent health. I would like some information about what type of radiation would be best for me.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 2 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I think a decision is best made with the facts from the pathology report and your oncologist. The treatments are now so tailor-made for each woman and no longer the "shot-gun" approach. The treatment plans could be completely different from one woman to another depending on the individual...

      more

      I think a decision is best made with the facts from the pathology report and your oncologist. The treatments are now so tailor-made for each woman and no longer the "shot-gun" approach. The treatment plans could be completely different from one woman to another depending on the individual findings... even if the diagnosis may seem the same on the surface. Did you have an Onco-Test DX? This is a test that can predict the chances of reoccurance in early stage breast cancer. It looks at individual cells and can give you a look into the future. It helps map out a treatment plan for you. It usually take a bit longer for that test result to come back. If you don't know if you had that test, ask your doctor. You are a good candidate for this test. Good luck to you and healing hugs! Sharon

      Comment
    • Alice Klobukowski Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      I don't know enough to answer your question but I have to say Hi since we are the same age. I will be 72 in July. I was diagnosed on Valentines Day with ER/PR- HER2 . I recently started the TCH Protocol. I hope you get the answers you need.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    A friend's wife was diagnosed with stage 4 breast cancer when she was 53He believes that the doctor failed to give her a mmaogram when she was 50 which would have saved her life. Could he be correct?.

    Asked by anonymous

    Family Member or Loved One
    about 6 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • teresa clark Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Who could ever know and really, we all have to take responsibility for our own health. After all, who's more invested? Us or the doctors?

      Comment
    • Mimi Carroll Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      If it was an aggressive cancer she could have had mamo at 50 and had stage 4. At 53. The aggressive cancers are usually found by the patient... Woman Feel s tumor or feels in nodes...
      I had routine mamos and got to stage 3 between mamos.... That is why self exams are so important...

      Comment
  • nancy  wilcox Profile

    I really want to know what Sharon, Diana, and Marianne think.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • K G Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Well I am not one of these three people, but I am an ICU nurse and am a survivor of breast cancer. The nurse used the word "probably" because she has probably seen a preliminary report. Was she reading those words from a piece of paper, was it your nurse, or was she the one doing the MRI, was...

      more

      Well I am not one of these three people, but I am an ICU nurse and am a survivor of breast cancer. The nurse used the word "probably" because she has probably seen a preliminary report. Was she reading those words from a piece of paper, was it your nurse, or was she the one doing the MRI, was she just talking to you and used those words? Sometimes as nurses we use words that we dont realize will have such a big impact on people. I learned that being a patient myself. Like "it will be ok", "quick little pinch", " probably". That nurse doesnt have the final result so she cant say that it is 100 percent negative, but she can say what she said to you to give you reassurance that it is probably negative with no mets. Although it ended up not being very reassuring to you. I guess to sum up-try not to focus on her words over the weekend. It will make you miserable. Remain positive and try to enjoy your weekend. Waiting is the hardest part, I know. I always told my caregivers-dont tell me "your going to be ok", tell me "your going to do great". I wish nothing but the best for you.

      1 comment
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Nancy, I agree with the ladies. It's a preliminary report....that's true. But not knowing and having to wait on the final results are terrifying. I'm so glad you decided to do the MRI. It is so much more accurate than a mammogram or ultrasound! I know from experience. I'm with Sharon...I have...

      more

      Hi Nancy, I agree with the ladies. It's a preliminary report....that's true. But not knowing and having to wait on the final results are terrifying. I'm so glad you decided to do the MRI. It is so much more accurate than a mammogram or ultrasound! I know from experience. I'm with Sharon...I have a good feeling about the results. I know how difficult it is. But try to do things this weekend that you enjoy doing. Monday will be here soon. You will be in my thoughts & prayers Nancy. Lots of hopeful hugs!!!! Diana

      2 comments
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