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sabrina morris's Story

About her story

Hello everyone I am Sabrina Morris am from Alabama.

Related Questions

  • Sandra Allen Profile

    i am having a double mastectomy in jan do you have depression afterwards

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Sandra,
      Unless you have a problem with clinical depression it usually doesn't come along with the territory. You could have some problems feeling --down-- because it is kind of a big deal both physically and a bit mentally. Not knowing how important body image is to each and every woman, the...

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      Sandra,
      Unless you have a problem with clinical depression it usually doesn't come along with the territory. You could have some problems feeling --down-- because it is kind of a big deal both physically and a bit mentally. Not knowing how important body image is to each and every woman, the realization of the loss of a breast means different things to different women. It is difficult to predict how you will feel. My breasts are small and I didn't particularly have any attachment to them in regards to body image. I just wanted to get rid of the breast cancer and was very happy to get rid of the body part that contained it.
      I chose not to have reconstruction and have done well with a prosthesis. I was 59 when diagnosed and made this decision. It is different if women are diagnosed in their 20's, 30's, 40's etc. A large percentage of them have reconstruction which sounds like it is a long, procedure and not very comfortable. Anyway.... as for depression, if you tend to get depressed or feel down, it may be a problem but I can't say it is as a matter of fact. Hang in there darlin' you are getting rid of a lousy sneaky disease and that IS the most important thing. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Well said Sharon, as usual. I had a double mastectomy about a year ago and I had very large breasts, it was a bit sad to say goodbye to them as they have been responsible for many free drinks in my life haha. But overall I am so glad I did it. I am going through reconstruction at the moment and...

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      Well said Sharon, as usual. I had a double mastectomy about a year ago and I had very large breasts, it was a bit sad to say goodbye to them as they have been responsible for many free drinks in my life haha. But overall I am so glad I did it. I am going through reconstruction at the moment and you are right Sharon it is long and uncomfortable but I would do it all again. The part of the mastectomy that I found difficult was the recovery and not being to do the things I was used to doing like driving and showering on my own. Good luck to you Sandra, you will be fine and like Sharon said you are getting rid of an awful illness and it is the best way to do it. Let us know are you going as you progress. Cheers

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    will invasive lobular carcinoma remove the whole breast?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 3 answers
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      My mass was 7.3 (about the size of a hard baseball) I lost the top half of my right breast.

      Comment
    • julie s Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      Not necessarily... There are a lot of factors involved... Stage, grade, size of the tumor, etc.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    What is the percentage of reoccurrence with invasive ductal carcinoma, no spread to nodes?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 9 years 2 answers
    • Susan Green Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      I would like to know the answer the that question also. I hope you had good luck. I'm waiting to see what will happen next. I had a mastectomy with three lymph nodes removed. The tumor was 5 cm and nodes were negative. It's been four weeks and still waiting! Good luck to you!

      Comment
    • carol small Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I am recently undergoing diagnosis and soon treatment for a recurrence after 18 years. There is not much literature out there because we are about 2% of the BC population. In 1994 I had 4mm invasive DCIS with no nodes. I only had surgery, no radiation, no chemo. However I now have a 3 inch x...

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      I am recently undergoing diagnosis and soon treatment for a recurrence after 18 years. There is not much literature out there because we are about 2% of the BC population. In 1994 I had 4mm invasive DCIS with no nodes. I only had surgery, no radiation, no chemo. However I now have a 3 inch x 1 1/2 inch tumor under my left arm that presents as breast cancer, but there is no breast tissue there due to masectomy. Unfortunately it has spread to a 1 cm tumor on my liver and a 1cm tumor on my spine. I think the first line of treatment will be radiation, and I am going to seek proton radiation therapy out of state because of the close proximity to my heart. Then I will be treated as chronic disease for chemo. I did not find it myself on self exam, it was hidden deep in my armpit. My regular exam doc found it.

      3 comments
  • Thumb avatar default

    can someone develop inflammatory breast cancer in both breasts

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2013
    about 6 years 1 answer
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      This is surely a possibility. It is a rare form of breast cancer and the chances of having it in both breasts would probably even more rare. If you are talking about yourself or have a family member or friend who it concerned about this, get yourself or your pal to the doctor asap. This is a...

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      This is surely a possibility. It is a rare form of breast cancer and the chances of having it in both breasts would probably even more rare. If you are talking about yourself or have a family member or friend who it concerned about this, get yourself or your pal to the doctor asap. This is a very fast growing, aggressive form of breast cancer. Diagnosing quickly gives the best chances. Quit fussing... get to the doctor NOW bring your suspicions with you.

      Comment

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