loading... close

Renee's Story

About her story

"I will still smile and I will still fight."

After discovering a lump during a self-breast exam, Renee scheduled a doctor's appointment and was later diagnosed with an aggressive form of Stage 4 breast cancer.

"The moment I heard that I had breast cancer, I had a game plan in my head that I was going to fight," said Renee.

Renee's prognosis for treatment was difficult, but she decided early on that she was going to fight. Even after losing the use of her legs, Renee faced breast cancer with a smile.

Watch Renee's story and discover why her inspiring testimony and life touched the hearts of the producers, directors, and staff behind the National Breast Cancer Foundation's Beyond the Shock program.

Related Questions

  • Jan Watt Profile

    Can anyone provide links to research statistics about radiation vs no radiation for (Early-stage, Grade 3, HER2+, clear margins, no nodal involvement) invasive BC please. Lumpectomy completed, Chemo underway. Want to base decision on statistics/facts.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 1 year 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Lou Cam Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      The standard of care for lumpectomy with invasive breast cancer is to have radiation. From radiologyinfo.org on the subject of breast cancer treatment: Nearly all studies show risk of relapse in the breast is much higher when radiation is not used (20% to 40 #) than when it is (5-10%).

      1 comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Patient

      I would always go with more treatment . It's hard to make a good decision easy to make a dumb one. I Would hate to have any regrets. You have to know you threw the book at breast cancer. I made the decision to have it and it's not bad you can do it . Glad I did it in the long run. I have done all...

      more

      I would always go with more treatment . It's hard to make a good decision easy to make a dumb one. I Would hate to have any regrets. You have to know you threw the book at breast cancer. I made the decision to have it and it's not bad you can do it . Glad I did it in the long run. I have done all that I can. Yeah it's annoying going everyday but better than the other.

      1 comment
  • Shelley Zipp Profile

    I just found out I have triple negative breast cancer, a form of invasive ductal carcinoma - stage 1 1.3cmm tumor, very small, but still requires llumpectomy, chemo, then radiation. What's the recovery time after a lumpectomy?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 3 answers
    • Sarah Adams Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      Has your doctor tested you for the BRCA gene mutation? If not, I would suggest doing that before moving forward with him/her. Triple negative breast cancer is most often associated with the BRCA gene mutation & if you happen to have it, you may be advised to do more than a lumpectomy. I'm no...

      more

      Has your doctor tested you for the BRCA gene mutation? If not, I would suggest doing that before moving forward with him/her. Triple negative breast cancer is most often associated with the BRCA gene mutation & if you happen to have it, you may be advised to do more than a lumpectomy. I'm no doctor...it's just a suggestion. I'd get a second opinion, anyway. :) Wishing you the best!

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hello - you know lumpectomies can vary enomormusly in size and location, as can the number and type of stitches required. All that as well as your general health and other complications such as infection means the recovery rate can vary significantly from person to person. I was discharged around...

      more

      Hello - you know lumpectomies can vary enomormusly in size and location, as can the number and type of stitches required. All that as well as your general health and other complications such as infection means the recovery rate can vary significantly from person to person. I was discharged around 16 hours after the operation. I had to stay overnight because of bad reaction to general anesthetic + I was a late in the day operation. I had about 57grams removed from my right inner upper quadrant and I had double stitching [underneath as well as on top]. It took about a week for the special bandages to fall off naturally. I was back doing 90 minute yoga class within a few days of the lumpectomy, so on one level it was a fast recovery BUT I needed some physiotherapy to restore my right arm mobility to about 95% of what it was - that was caused by the sentinel node biopsy though, not the lumpectomy. Many women I have spoken to say they experience more problems from the sentinel node biopsy rather than the lumpectomy. The lumpectomy is a fat removal essentially whereas the sentinel node biopsy is close to a lot of nerves and pathways and muscles so this is not unexpected.

      Comment
  • Terri Miller Profile

    As you go thru the chemo treatments, do the side effects progressively get worse?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Terri,
      Just as Michele said, we are all different. I didn't have cumulative effects I had a week where I felt like I had the flu and then got better. It depends on how your body handles the chemo and how it recovers from each treatment. Take care Sharon

      Comment
    • Isabel Souchet Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      Yes everyone is different. Mine got worse each treatment. Ive met people that really did well. My onco said i was an exception, i had every side effect.

      Comment
  • Lori Kelly Profile

    I was diagnosed with Stage III breast cancer last March. I had a double mastectomy, have gone through 8 cycles of dose dense chemotherapy as well as radiation. I am now on Tamoxifen 20 mgs daily. What is my chance for recurrance?

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2012
    almost 6 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Lori,

      I always wonder why we humans seek out the most awful information? I have done the same thing but learned to just not read it because it's a statistic. We can also walk out of our house and get hit by a bus. I also don't read about my chances of getting hit by a bus.... same reason......

      more

      Lori,

      I always wonder why we humans seek out the most awful information? I have done the same thing but learned to just not read it because it's a statistic. We can also walk out of our house and get hit by a bus. I also don't read about my chances of getting hit by a bus.... same reason... it's a statistic.You have just waged a huge war as Diana has done.
      You live your life, you go get your check-ups, and be careful when you cross the street!
      None of us know what is in out future so it is much more healthy to think positive rather than focue on those "what-if's?" I have had my own dark thoughts just like everyone so I know exactly, where you are coming from. It is time for you to get back out there and live your life. Ba-zillions of women have walked your path and are healthy today. Why can't you end up being one of them instead of the other? I would ask God to lighten this burden. It is painful and not healthy. Hang in there.... healing hugs, Sharon

      1 comment
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Lori, our stories are very similar! I was diagnosed with stage 3C breast cancer last May. I went through 8 cycles of dose dense chemo, a double mastectomy, then 8 more cycles of code dense chemo with 2 different drugs than before which took place 3 weeks after my mastectomy. She used stage 4...

      more

      Hi Lori, our stories are very similar! I was diagnosed with stage 3C breast cancer last May. I went through 8 cycles of dose dense chemo, a double mastectomy, then 8 more cycles of code dense chemo with 2 different drugs than before which took place 3 weeks after my mastectomy. She used stage 4 drugs on me the second time due to extensive lymph node involvement, & other things that were found. Then I went through radiation. It's been 1 week ago today since I had my final rad treatment. I've been on 20 mg of Tamoxifen for 1 week now.
      On my visit last week I asked my Oncologist the same question. What are my chances for reoccurrence? She told me basically that there's always going to be a chance for reoccurrence. But there's no way to predict that with percentages. It's impossible. Each woman is different. A lot of women live years & years who have had stage 3 cancer. I'm not going to lie...there have been times in the past where I've looked at the survival stats online with our stage of cancer. But it brought no good doing so. No one knows for sure when our time on earth is finished. My Oncologist is such an upbeat person. Very caring with her patients. I just can't say good enough things about her. And I respected her for saying what she did. There's always going to be a part of me that wonders if it will ever return. I know this sounds cliche but I'm going to do the right things health wise, and live the rest of my life (however long that may be) with purpose. AND abundantly. Hugs Lori

      1 comment

Educational Video

Personal Story

Related Topics

Looking for another topic?
Use the search box in the top right.

Footer 2

Inspire hope by becoming an advocate for breast cancer prevention.

spread the word