loading... close

Renee's Story

About her story

"I will still smile and I will still fight."

After discovering a lump during a self-breast exam, Renee scheduled a doctor's appointment and was later diagnosed with an aggressive form of Stage 4 breast cancer.

"The moment I heard that I had breast cancer, I had a game plan in my head that I was going to fight," said Renee.

Renee's prognosis for treatment was difficult, but she decided early on that she was going to fight. Even after losing the use of her legs, Renee faced breast cancer with a smile.

Watch Renee's story and discover why her inspiring testimony and life touched the hearts of the producers, directors, and staff behind the National Breast Cancer Foundation's Beyond the Shock program.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    I had a 12mm grade 1A tubular carcinoma removed 3 weeks ago. My sentinal node came back negative. I am still confused about whether or not to have radiation therapy. Are there any permenent side effects or danger?

    Asked by anonymous

    stage_1 Patient
    over 2 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Lou Cam Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      If you have invasive breast cancer , which 1A is , the ordinary standard of care is either lumpectomy with radiation, or mastectomy with or without rads, depending on your situation.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      In medicine, there are always two sides to a coin. There is always a positive and negative side. The proper way to make a decision it so hear both sides, and then make a choice. Just because there MAY be negatives, that doesn't mean they will happen to you. You have to think rationally about...

      more

      In medicine, there are always two sides to a coin. There is always a positive and negative side. The proper way to make a decision it so hear both sides, and then make a choice. Just because there MAY be negatives, that doesn't mean they will happen to you. You have to think rationally about your decision and not emotionally. No one can tell how many cancer cells may have escaped the original tumor site. The radiation is probably a preventative treatment to developing a future recurrence.
      When I had treatment, which was a course of chemotherapy, there were all sorts of horrendous side effects that might happen. Odds were better in my favor to take the chance and go through chemotherapy. As it turned out, nothing, of any long range possible problems, happened to me. I am healthy and cancer free going into my 9th year. My tumor was 2.3CM, a stage 2B with rather aggressive grade, type of cancer with one positive lymph node. Treatment is always a gamble, there are programs online you and your oncologist can go over. You can see what the statistics are to going through radiation or not. Mine was a no brainer. Good luck and take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • Lori S Profile

    Any suggestions to alleviate bone ache? I got a shot of neulasta the day following my first treatment to boost white blood cells and I am uncomfortably very achy.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Natasha Nunnally Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Claratin is also what my nurses recommended. I haven't tried it yet as I suffered from horrible headaches with the nuelasta shot.

      Comment
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Oops...I didn't finish. I tried it and it does help. You take one an hour before your shot. Then daily for five days.

      Comment
  • Nikol Vega Profile

    Any ideas on how to tell my 10 year old daughter I have breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Surf  Momma Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I have a 10 year old and year old. I just told both kids one month ago. I told them when I knew I would not be hysterical about it. It is all in your delivery. My kids have been fine.

      Comment
    • Janelle Strunk Profile
      anonymous
      Family Member or Loved One

      Nikol,

      Be strong, but be honest. Most experts advise that you talk to your child about the cancer as soon as you are able to manage your own emotions. You do not have to hide your emotions, but be sure to wait until you can focus on the needs of your children and not your own.

      It might also...

      more

      Nikol,

      Be strong, but be honest. Most experts advise that you talk to your child about the cancer as soon as you are able to manage your own emotions. You do not have to hide your emotions, but be sure to wait until you can focus on the needs of your children and not your own.

      It might also be helpful to come up with an outline of topics that you want to cover, because your talk with your daughter will likely become emotional and you may forget what you wanted to say.

      Here is a link to a short article in Parents that may be helpful: http://www.parents.com/parenting/moms/healthy-mom/6-ways-to-tell-your-kids-about-breast-cancer/

      Also, remember that you are not alone. Not too long ago, on this site, someone else asked the question "How do I tell my kids". Click on this question and you can see some suggestions from women who have also had to do this: http://beyondtheshock.com/questions/561

      I am so sorry to hear about your diagnosis, but am wishing you the best. Stay strong and keep hope!

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Intense abdominal pain following first round of chemo. Stomach is constantly hurting, food (plain, digestible) doesn't feel like it is digesting but sits in stomach for hours and am also experiencing acid reflux. Any tips or suggestions?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 2 years 3 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      You need to let your team know about it as they probably have some suggestions that may help you. My place gave me a multiple page printout after my first infusion that had lots of good info. in it including the possible side effects, etc. and what to do if this or this occurred.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      This question needs to go to your care team immediately. They will be best equipped to give you the correct answers. Now, please call them! Take care, Sharon

      Comment

Educational Video

Personal Story

Related Topics

Looking for another topic?
Use the search box in the top right.

Footer 3

Breast cancer affects one out of every eight women in their lifetime.

spread the word