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Linnea's Story

About her story

"I decided that chemo was going to be my friend and that it was going to save me."

In April of 2001, Linnea was diagnosed with Stage 3 breast cancer. Her treatment regimen included chemotherapy and radiation, but she soon discovered that her best medicine was a motherly instinct to survive.

In this poignant video, Linnea talks about how her 10 year old daughter gave her the strength and motivation to move beyond the shock of breast cancer.

Related Questions

  • Mary Anne Babicky-Bouton Profile

    Had an MRI - found another node, same breast on the other side. Ugh. I haven't even started this adventure yet and I'm already overhelmed. I feel like such a loser because everyone is so strong on this site. Thanks for listening! God Bless you all!

    Asked by anonymous

    stage_4 Patient
    about 7 years 10 answers
    • View all 10 answers
    • M M Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2B Patient

      You're not a loser! You're completely normal. I was crying and in the fetal position for almost a week. Once you start treatment and every other step after that you will feel stronger. I promise you this. I've done chemo and a bilateral mastectomy just a month ago. I'm now starting rads and...

      more

      You're not a loser! You're completely normal. I was crying and in the fetal position for almost a week. Once you start treatment and every other step after that you will feel stronger. I promise you this. I've done chemo and a bilateral mastectomy just a month ago. I'm now starting rads and I am nervousness but I know it's just another step. You will gain strength daily Mary Anne and one day you will be lifting others up. Stop kicking yourself, you're on the right track.

      2 comments
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Mary Anne,
      You are TOTALLY NOT a loser! This is all very overwhelming and I thought the diagnosis part was particularly scary. You just don't know exactly where you stand and the -not knowing- is just the worst. You actually do become stronger as time goes on. You find out what your treatment...

      more

      Mary Anne,
      You are TOTALLY NOT a loser! This is all very overwhelming and I thought the diagnosis part was particularly scary. You just don't know exactly where you stand and the -not knowing- is just the worst. You actually do become stronger as time goes on. You find out what your treatment is going to be so at least there is a --finish line-- in a set time. You will get through this, but it is tough and quite a slog through a lot of crud. I got so I looked forward to the treatments because it meant I was working my way to the end. I loved the doctor's, staff, and tech's that helped me, and I found I did much more laughing than I did feeling bad. Oh, I did have my days but there were far less bad days than good. Be sure to keep a sense of humor about the entire experience but always keep in mind you need to be your own best advocate. If something doesn't seem quite right... ASK QUESTIONS! You WILL be ok, you will get through this and do not be tough on yourself. You have never had breast cancer before and I know you will become a warrior just like the rest of us! Hang in there darlin' and great big fuzzy pony hugs to you.
      God's blessings and take care, Sharon

      1 comment
  • Kristin Burghard Profile

    Should I take tamoxifen or have my ovaries removed?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 2 answers
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      Morning Kristen I pondered the same question in 2008. Did a lot of research saw an gyn oncologist and talked to a lot of other doctors. I also had a negative BRCA I and II Gene testing is the first requirement with a positive BRCA I and II for insurance to cover the removal of your ovaries. ...

      more

      Morning Kristen I pondered the same question in 2008. Did a lot of research saw an gyn oncologist and talked to a lot of other doctors. I also had a negative BRCA I and II Gene testing is the first requirement with a positive BRCA I and II for insurance to cover the removal of your ovaries. At least here in Hawaii. I was willing to pay for the procedure on my own at first. But after researching how estrogen is produced in your body I discovered that your ovaries are only partly producing estrogen you also produce estrogen from your adrenal glands so even with your ovaries removed you would still have to take some form of an estrogen blocker ... I still have my ovaries have been on tamoxifen for three years and am officially menopausal now so was switched to arimedix which I will take for another 5 years. I've read that there is research going on in finding another medication that breast cancer survivors will take for life. Have to say I was counting down two more years of tamoxifen so was hit with a hard blow when my doctor advised me to switch to arimedix for another 5 years. Took me a couple of months to warm up to the idea but bottom line is I really don't want another reoccurrence and if there is something that could possibly prevent it got to go with it. Take care

      3 comments
    • Karen Locklear Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I had to have my ovaries removed because I could not take tamoxifen. I had major side effects at first and then became allergic to it. After surgery, I am now on Femaria and other than bone pain, I am doing well taking it. I know a good many women that could not take tamoxifen for several...

      more

      I had to have my ovaries removed because I could not take tamoxifen. I had major side effects at first and then became allergic to it. After surgery, I am now on Femaria and other than bone pain, I am doing well taking it. I know a good many women that could not take tamoxifen for several reasons. I would have my ovaries removed if I were you. I hope this helps!!! God Bless You!!!

      2 comments
  • Thumb avatar default

    Could I have breast cancer? I have a raised mole or a piece of skin sticking up from my areola that did not use to be there.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 1 answer
    • nancy  wilcox Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      you should check with your doctor of course. it could just be a skin tag, but do not take chances with your health- see a doctor. hope you do well.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    What are the chances of breast cancer coming back after chemo?

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2007
    over 8 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Mary Anne Babicky-Bouton Profile
      anonymous
      stage_4 Patient

      I am 2 1/2 years from last radiation treatment. I had no active cancer at that time, The chemo and radiation was because I was intermediate chance of recurrence.
      I was just diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer. It's in lymph nodes, bone and neck. Please ask your oncologist to do pet scan or...

      more

      I am 2 1/2 years from last radiation treatment. I had no active cancer at that time, The chemo and radiation was because I was intermediate chance of recurrence.
      I was just diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer. It's in lymph nodes, bone and neck. Please ask your oncologist to do pet scan or something 1 year after you complete treatment. I just found a lump in my neck but no other symptoms.
      This was not anybody's fault but I wish I had had some kind of scan to check after 1 year.
      Starting oral chemo in two weeks. God bless and good luck!

      Comment
    • anonymous Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I was told by both my surgeon and oncologist that should there be a reoccurrence it would be within five years.

      Comment

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