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Invasive ductal carcinoma - wait for surgery 6 weeks. I'm 75 and may not survive the surgery. Will 6 week wait be a major additional health risk or can surgery, followed by the recommended radiation and chemo do the job?

Dolores Hagen Profile
Asked by

anonymous

Learning About Breast Cancer over 6 years
 
  • Sharon Danielson Profile
    anonymous
    Survivor since 2007
    Oh My Goodness Dolores! Unless you have have a giant glaring physical reason you WILL come through the surgery just fine! If you are taking a blood thinning agent, it takes time for that to get out of your system but I wouldn't worry about not making it through the surgery. I also had invasive ductal carcinoma. I had a mastectomy, 4 rounds of chemo, and 5 years of hormone blocking therapy. (one pill a day). That was all 5 years ago and I am back to normal and playing with my horses again. I am 64, and was also terrified about the surgery but for me, it was easy. Did the doctor say you are a serious surgical risk? Has your cancer been staged yet? Stage 1, 2, 3, 4? Unless your cancer is some high grade aggressive type, you shouldn't worry about waiting the 6 weeks. Dolores, breast cancer isn't usually the killer it used to be before they had all these whiz-bang drugs, surgery, and radiation. The vast majority of women go through treatment and just march on with their lives. Even women who have some pretty involved cases, can live long lives. What information has the doctor given you.... we have the type of breast cancer, what stage 1-4? what size is the tumor, and what is the grade... will be 1 to 3? Is it estrogen positive etc.? You have the MOST COMMON TYPE OF BREAST CANCER! That means a lot right there... lots available to treat it. I want you to stay here with us so we can help you get through this. We are like a great big sorority house here.... unfortunately, it is the Breast Cancer Sorority Sisters... but we are a friendly bunch. We know you are scared, and were probably blind-sided with this diagnosis as we all are. Since you are in the diagnosis phase there is a lot you don't yet know about your cancer. As you go along, and have more testing done, you, honestly, will feel better. Nothing scares you more than the unknown. Many of the women here are actively going through treatment right now, and others are just completing it. There are so many young women under 40 with babies and little kids. You and I are fossils compared to them. You will fight your way through this. Please keep in touch with us. You really turn into a bit of a warrior through your treatment. Do you have family or friends that can help you get through the appointments? Hang in there girl, you can do this. Please keep in touch with us. Take care, Sharon
    over 6 years Comment Flag
  • Thumb avatar default
    anonymous
    Learning About Breast Cancer
    Dolores, we don't know when our time is up. Don't give urself an expectation date. U nor I know when or how only God know. All I can say is I will be praying for u & please remember God is able to do anything. Please don't give up on urself. Listen to ur doctors, but most of all get on ur knees & cry out to God. If u seat still enough u will hear Him give u an affirmation of what He wants u to do. We so often don't listen to the voice of God. We need to learn how to stand still & allow Him to move. God bless u & I will lift ur name up tonight.
    over 6 years Comment Flag
  • Dolores Hagen Profile
    anónimo
    Aprendiendo sobre el cáncer de mama
    Sharon: You will never know how much your response means to me.... You made my day, PLUS! I just am at the beginning of what looks like a road I can navigate.... thanks to you! My desired wish to wait until after December for my surgery is do to a 36 family member cruise we have been planning since March... At 75 and with some other health issues, I didn't want to go under the knife until after the trip. I don't know a whole lot yet about my situation other than very preliminary bio info such as a guess at state 2 with no node involvement via ultra sound. I forced the issue to go beyond just the surgeon by asking to see the oncologist this coming Monday. I'm sure he will be able to give me more specifics... I just had the bio last week and was scheduled for surgery this Friday, but put the breaks on after checking with my family doctor. My other health issues are a concern making my desire to wait six weeks very real to me... This Family trip is Very Important to me... can you tell? Again thanks for all your help... and I will stay on the board for all it has given me through your wonderful post.... Again, Thank You.
    over 6 years Flag
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Dolores,
      If you would like, you can contact me via my email address.
      kharazi@aol.com I can tell how important that family trip is and I don't think your boob will fall off in that amount of time.
      I am thrilled to hear you are also getting a...

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      Dolores,
      If you would like, you can contact me via my email address.
      kharazi@aol.com I can tell how important that family trip is and I don't think your boob will fall off in that amount of time.
      I am thrilled to hear you are also getting a consultation with an oncologist. Most mature women aren't treated as aggressively as younger women. You are one sharp cookie to ask for that referral, I am proud of you! I was also a stage 2 and had micro involvement of one lymph node. Again.... I am still here, alive and kicking. Many women have to wait at least 3 weeks for their surgery so what's another 3 weeks? Don't you dare think of this family trip as a "Bon Voyage" to you and life either!. You will get through this, darlin'
      One good thing about finding disease at later ages, it almost seems to be not as aggressive. Not to take this lightly, at all, but being "long in the tooth" has its advantages. I hope your care team agrees you can wait. I'd hate like heck to miss a party like that! You hang in there, I can tell you are made of strong stuff. Please keep us posted and you can email if you care to. Take care, Sharon

      over 6 years Flag
    • Coco Smith Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hello Dolores, you may have a host of co-morbitities that you have not detailed in your short message. If so, the contribution [if any to the surgical risk for breast cancer will need calculation and consideration with your treating specialists....

      more

      Hello Dolores, you may have a host of co-morbitities that you have not detailed in your short message. If so, the contribution [if any to the surgical risk for breast cancer will need calculation and consideration with your treating specialists.
      The statistics for not surviving this surgery are incredibly low. A tiny percentage of people can die from the general anaesthetic, but I am talking 1-2%. Also because breast tissue is fatty tissue [not bone] and relatively simple surgery compared to removing an internal organ, the volume and duration of general anaesthesia is lower for breast cancer surgery. The longer one stays under anaesthesia and the more used, the greater the risk.
      A comprehensive analysis of all your conditions should reveal your overall risk level and there are things you can do to further reduce some risks. Others not.
      I was stage 1 invasive breast cancer with no node affected and I had 7 days from my formal diagnosis to my surgery day. My surgeon told me I could wait a month without it being a major problem if I so wished, but in Australia invasive breast cancer patients awaiting surgery are on the surgical priority list, so 7 days was the fastest I could get the surgery.
      I very much wanted it operated on and out immediately as being node negative, I did not want to run any risk of a months delay allowing my invasive BC to travel to my negative nodes and render them positive.
      I had never had surgery or general anaesthesia before, have high blood pressure and was really concerned I may pass away during surgery. I therefore ensured that in the 7 days from diagnosis to surgery, I updated my Will, signed a Power of Attorney in case I was unable to make medical decisions for myself and I also signed a Health Care Directives setting out my wishes in case I needed resuscitation, had brain damage or had adverse outcomes during surgery that left me unable to communicate my wishes. Although some may feel that degree of preparation is unnecessary, it certainly helped me get through the surgery as I knew I had made as many contingency plans as I could in the event it all went wrong.
      Everyone has their own decision making matrix applicable to their personal circumstances and personality.

      over 6 years Flag
  • Carolyn Boatner Profile
    anonymous
    Learning About Breast Cancer
    Oh sweet sister--go on that cruise!! Leave all your health concerns at the dock. When you return, pick Em up and face the head on! Trust me, nobody else will retrieve them!! This will be just one more beautiful piece of stained glass that makes up the beauty of you!! Now let your light shine through that magnificent artwork of glass! You will be fine, and nobody is assured a tomorrow! So make today count!! Sail away sister and play hard! Blessings and peace!!!
    over 6 years Comment Flag
  • vicki e Profile
    anonymous
    Stage 2B Patient
    Delores. Hang in there and know we are pulling for you The other girls are right on target! By the way my grandmother had bilateral mastectomy at 80 and came through easy breezy! I'm betting you will too! Keep us posted.
    over 6 years Comment Flag
  • Becky Lynn Profile
    anonymous
    Stage 1 Patient
    Hi Dolores. The other ladies are right! My mom survived a mastectomy, chemo and radiation at 75. She's 80 now and doing great! Enjoy that cruise and then tackle your treatment. You can do it!
    over 6 years Comment Flag

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