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Treatment

 
Treatment

Chapter: 6 - Treatment

Subchapter: 2 - Standard Treatment & Clinical Trials

Before selecting your treatment plan, you should first understand the difference between standard treatment and clinical trials.

Standard treatments are methods that experts agree are appropriate, accepted and widely used. These standard procedures have proven useful in fighting breast cancer in the past. A clinical trial, on the other hand, is an approved research study that some doctors believe has a strong potential to improve standard treatments. When clinical trials demonstrate better results than the standard, that new treatment becomes the standard. Remember, all our current standards were clinical trials at one time.

If a clinical trial is an option for you, your doctor will explain the possible trade-offs with the trial treatment versus standard treatment. Together with your medical team, you will need to decide what treatment method is the best for you and your health.

Let’s look more closely at the standard treatments your doctors may recommend.

Related Questions

  • Linda Green Profile

    Recommended clothes for first few days after masectomy? PJs open in front or tshirts?

    Asked by anonymous

    Patient
    about 8 years 8 answers
    • View all 8 answers
    • Lisa S Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Anything comfortable that opens in the front. You will probably come home wearing a surgical bra that you'll keep on for a bit. Good luck.

      Comment
    • Darcy W Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I had a mastectomy 4 weeks ago. I wore yoga pants...easy to pull up and down and zip up hoodies....you should not expect to be able to pull a shirt over your head for awhile. The hospital gave me two snap up camisoles with inside pockets for the drain...theses were great. Best of luck to...

      more

      I had a mastectomy 4 weeks ago. I wore yoga pants...easy to pull up and down and zip up hoodies....you should not expect to be able to pull a shirt over your head for awhile. The hospital gave me two snap up camisoles with inside pockets for the drain...theses were great. Best of luck to you....the recovery was much easier than I anticipated.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Anyone with issues having radiation to implants?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 1 Patient
    over 6 years 2 answers
    • Lou Cam Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      When I had partial mastectomy and nodes removed, I also had implant exchange. My radiologist and breast surgeon agreed this was best, as I had very old implants. The rads/partial mastectomy side is firmer , not as soft as the non rads side. At my last follow up appt the plastic surgeon told me...

      more

      When I had partial mastectomy and nodes removed, I also had implant exchange. My radiologist and breast surgeon agreed this was best, as I had very old implants. The rads/partial mastectomy side is firmer , not as soft as the non rads side. At my last follow up appt the plastic surgeon told me to do sort of a exercise/massage thing everyday to prevent hardening. I do have some soreness and mild pain sometimes. As far as shape and the breasts matching, the ps made adjustments in implant size to make sure they match perfectly. Also, my radiation was very precise, above the implant (which is under the muscle), I think it was called IMRT.

      1 comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I didn't have implants but my chemo buddy had to have one removed.

      Comment
  • Linda Williams Profile

    Met with the radiologist today, no rads!

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 4 Patient
    over 7 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      Yeah!

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Linda..... YAHOOOOO! That is fabulous because you won't have to make ENDLESS trips for weeks, and weeks. PHEW.... great news, congratulations!
      Take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • Melissa Hicks Profile

    Had IDC ER PR- and HER2 had mastectomy it did NOT go in the lymph nodes and they got clean margins. They said I would need 4 - 6 rounds of chemo - TC (taxotere) and herceptin for a year. Why do I need chemo if they are using herceptin?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 3 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      We aren't doctors here and that sounds like something you should be asking yours. Everyone's cancer is different therefore a treatment plan is made just for you.

      Comment
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      There are informative videos here on this site you should check out. Being her2 positive USE TO BE a death sentence. Be thankful for the many advancements in the past 15 or so years. Simply put, being her2 positive means that each of your cancer cells duplicate themselves very rapidly. You need a...

      more

      There are informative videos here on this site you should check out. Being her2 positive USE TO BE a death sentence. Be thankful for the many advancements in the past 15 or so years. Simply put, being her2 positive means that each of your cancer cells duplicate themselves very rapidly. You need a 1 - 2 punch. Chemo and herceptin. Think of the cancer cell as a peanut M&M. The chemo eats the outer candy shell and the herceptin comes along and eats all the peanuts. Lol. It works, go with it. It's what will keep you alive. I'm not sure if you said you were er positive or negative, but that would play a role in your chemo treatment as well. The herceptin is strictly for the her2. I am triple positive, diagnosed in 2012. Living life!!! Prayers to you.

      1 comment

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