loading... close

Treatment

 
Treatment

Chapter: 6 - Treatment

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Treatment Introduction
In recent years, due to earlier detection and more effective treatments, many women diagnosed with breast cancer overcome the disease and go on to live healthy lives.

Treatment Options Recommended By Your Health Care Provider
It’s important to understand the different types of treatment options available to you, because you are an integral part of your decision-making team. Your medical team will advocate certain treatments, but they will also seek your input.

They will recommend a plan based on:
- Stage of cancer and whether or not it has spread
- Type of cancer, and status of the estrogen, progesterone, or HER2/neu receptors found in the cancer cells
- Your age, health, and menstrual/menopausal stage
- And whether or not this is your first cancer treatment

In general, there are five treatment options, and most treatment plans include a combination of the following:
1) Surgery
2) Radiation
3) Hormone Therapy
4) Chemotherapy
5) Targeted Therapies

Some are local, targeting just the area around the tumor with surgery or radiation. Others are systemic, targeting your whole body with cancer-fighting agents such as chemotherapy.

Most women receive a combination of treatments, but each case is unique, and your medical team will work to find the most effective treatment for you.

Getting A Second Opinion
Even so, you may find yourself second-guessing their recommendations or suggested treatment plan. If you’re hesitant for any reason, you should get the opinion of another doctor before beginning treatment. Your doctor will not mind if you want a second opinion; some insurance plans even require it.

Again, don’t hesitate to ask your medical team questions. When it comes to getting a second opinion, you are your own best advocate.

Related Questions

  • bizuayehu sitotaw Profile

    signs of stage four breast cancer

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 5 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      This is almost impossible to say because it depends on the type of breast cancer. Many of the symptoms are invisible because they take place in the lymph system. If the main cancer is in the form of a tumor, it will get larger, but not all breast cancers form lumps. If you are worried, get...

      more

      This is almost impossible to say because it depends on the type of breast cancer. Many of the symptoms are invisible because they take place in the lymph system. If the main cancer is in the form of a tumor, it will get larger, but not all breast cancers form lumps. If you are worried, get your self to a doctor immediately. Breast cancer is a tough disease but the longer you wait, the more intense the treament and the more difficult it will be to win the fight. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Life is Good! Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      Stage 4 Breast Cancer usually spreads to the liver, bones, brain or lungs. It is wise to report any unusual symptoms such as prolonged unexplained pain, persistent cough, shortness of breath, drop in appetite, unintentional weight loss, weakness, prolonged fatigue, or sudden/significant changes...

      more

      Stage 4 Breast Cancer usually spreads to the liver, bones, brain or lungs. It is wise to report any unusual symptoms such as prolonged unexplained pain, persistent cough, shortness of breath, drop in appetite, unintentional weight loss, weakness, prolonged fatigue, or sudden/significant changes in vision to your doctor. Keep the questions coming. We are here for you!!!

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    If I have a invasive tubular carcinoma tumor that is 4cm, how long should I wait before surgery removal? (my doctors say they cannot do it for two weeks...I am concerned it will grow or spread elsewhere )

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 1 answer
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      I can totally understand your concern. From what I've read....invasive tubular carcinoma tends to be low grade which means it is a slower growing cancer & two weeks is a reasonable time period to wait. I had to have chemo prior to my surgery due to my stage of cancer. I will have my mastectomy...

      more

      I can totally understand your concern. From what I've read....invasive tubular carcinoma tends to be low grade which means it is a slower growing cancer & two weeks is a reasonable time period to wait. I had to have chemo prior to my surgery due to my stage of cancer. I will have my mastectomy this coming Monday. That will be a period of four weeks between my last chemo and date of surgery. Here's a link that might help. http://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/types/rare_idc/tubular/. Good luck with your surgery. :)

      Diana

      Comment
  • Sharon Danielson Profile

    Good News From Seminar In San Antonio For Triple Negative. Here is a link from Breastcancer.org. SABCS: A Recap of Triple-Negative Research http://community.breastcancer.org/blog/sabcs-a-recap-of-triple-negative-research/

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2007
    over 5 years 2 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Thanks Sharon. I read the article and it seems very optimistic. Just what tnbc's need. Hugs

      2 comments
    • Net M Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      Good news, indeed! :)

      -net

      Comment
  • Linda Burke Profile

    I have 2 chemo cycles left and I am questioning whether I can bounce right back into my prior life as people expect me to. My work wants me to start right away but my mind and body don't feel ready. How have people handled this?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 1 Patient
    about 6 years 8 answers
    • View all 8 answers
    • Isabel Souchet Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      I didnt work full time, I was too sick. Thankfully my boss was understanding n let me do a lot of work from home. It took me almost a year to feel normal again. Listen o your body, whatever anyone else thinks doesn't matter. Honestly nobody who hasn't been through this can really understand,...

      more

      I didnt work full time, I was too sick. Thankfully my boss was understanding n let me do a lot of work from home. It took me almost a year to feel normal again. Listen o your body, whatever anyone else thinks doesn't matter. Honestly nobody who hasn't been through this can really understand, family, friends etc. I was true to myself and only did what I could do.

      Comment
    • Evelyn Heilbrunn Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Hi Linda, you don't mention how many cycles you will have had. I had 6 and it took me 3-4 weeks to start to feel "normal" again. At about week 4 it was like I woke up one morning and said "hey, I feel pretty good!" I didn't push it, though, because I was still anemic and got tired quickly. ...

      more

      Hi Linda, you don't mention how many cycles you will have had. I had 6 and it took me 3-4 weeks to start to feel "normal" again. At about week 4 it was like I woke up one morning and said "hey, I feel pretty good!" I didn't push it, though, because I was still anemic and got tired quickly. Despite what they might want, I don't believe your job can require you to return to work before you are healed from your treatment. Nor can they "punish" you in any way for not returning when they wanted you to. I'd talk to your HR person if you have one, and certainly review your company handbook or policies if they have them. If necessary get a note from your doctor stating that your health doesn't permit you to begin working for XX weeks or months.
      Good luck!

      Comment

Educational Video

Personal Story

Related Topics

Looking for another topic?
Use the search box in the top right.

Footer 2

Inspire hope by becoming an advocate for breast cancer prevention.

spread the word