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Treatment

 
Treatment

Chapter: 6 - Treatment

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Treatment Introduction
In recent years, due to earlier detection and more effective treatments, many women diagnosed with breast cancer overcome the disease and go on to live healthy lives.

Treatment Options Recommended By Your Health Care Provider
It’s important to understand the different types of treatment options available to you, because you are an integral part of your decision-making team. Your medical team will advocate certain treatments, but they will also seek your input.

They will recommend a plan based on:
- Stage of cancer and whether or not it has spread
- Type of cancer, and status of the estrogen, progesterone, or HER2/neu receptors found in the cancer cells
- Your age, health, and menstrual/menopausal stage
- And whether or not this is your first cancer treatment

In general, there are five treatment options, and most treatment plans include a combination of the following:
1) Surgery
2) Radiation
3) Hormone Therapy
4) Chemotherapy
5) Targeted Therapies

Some are local, targeting just the area around the tumor with surgery or radiation. Others are systemic, targeting your whole body with cancer-fighting agents such as chemotherapy.

Most women receive a combination of treatments, but each case is unique, and your medical team will work to find the most effective treatment for you.

Getting A Second Opinion
Even so, you may find yourself second-guessing their recommendations or suggested treatment plan. If you’re hesitant for any reason, you should get the opinion of another doctor before beginning treatment. Your doctor will not mind if you want a second opinion; some insurance plans even require it.

Again, don’t hesitate to ask your medical team questions. When it comes to getting a second opinion, you are your own best advocate.

Related Questions

  • Denise Waters Profile

    Is love making after tomoxifim enjoyable?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 9 years Answer
  • Nadine Cancilliere Profile

    6th chemo done, 2 to go; yay! My onc says they dont run scans after chemo. Anyone else heard of this. I mean how will they know if its gone or hasnt spread? They did say the chemo and radiation are a preventative measure.

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 3A Patient
    almost 7 years 16 answers
    • View all 16 answers
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      No scans until a red flag comes up. In this case no news is the best news.

      1 comment
    • Life is Good! Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      No routine scans for me . However, you know your body... Report any changes, unexplained pain, lumps, etc to you doctor. I try not to let the possibility of the cancer coming back steal my joy. Congrats! You are almost at the finish line! Your pink Sisters are cheering for you!

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Well My Oncotype Test Came Back In The Middle, I Have to Make Some Decisons and Pray About it with a score of 20.

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    almost 8 years 2 answers
    • Lori S Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I don't remember the number off the top of my head, but I was in that middle gray area. I had the chemo based on that and the aggressiveness of my cancer cells which was caught very early. I trusted my oncologist and went for it. There's no right or wrong, no guarantee with anything. Look at...

      more

      I don't remember the number off the top of my head, but I was in that middle gray area. I had the chemo based on that and the aggressiveness of my cancer cells which was caught very early. I trusted my oncologist and went for it. There's no right or wrong, no guarantee with anything. Look at all your specifics, test results and research if you have questions. Only you should make the decision for you. And whatever you decide will be the right decision.

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      Thanks Lori!!!!!

      Comment
  • Tsehaye Teshome Profile

    Why am I losing my hair?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 8 years 3 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Hi Tsehave,

      Hair loss occurs because chemotherapy targets all rapidly dividing cells—healthy cells as well as cancer cells. Hair follicles, the structures in the skin filled with tiny blood vessels that make hair, are some of the fastest-growing cells in the body. If you're not in cancer...

      more

      Hi Tsehave,

      Hair loss occurs because chemotherapy targets all rapidly dividing cells—healthy cells as well as cancer cells. Hair follicles, the structures in the skin filled with tiny blood vessels that make hair, are some of the fastest-growing cells in the body. If you're not in cancer treatment, your hair follicles divide every 23 to 72 hours. But as the chemo does its work against cancer cells, it also destroys hair cells. Within a few weeks of starting chemo, you may lose some or all of your hair. (I started having hair loss 2 weeks after my first chemo. treatment) I hope this helps! Take care, Sharon

      2 comments
    • Delicia matthews Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      This IPad...that's second....excuse me

      3 comments

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Breast cancer affects one out of every eight women in their lifetime.

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