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Types & Stages

 
Types & Stages

Chapter: 5 - Types & Stages

Subchapter: 7 - Inflammatory Breast Cancer

Inflammatory Breast Cancer is another uncommon but aggressive form of cancer, in which abnormal cells infiltrate the skin and lymph vessels of the breast. This type of cancer usually does not produce a distinct tumor or lump that can be felt and isolated within the breast. Symptoms begin to appear when the lymph vessels become blocked by the cancer cells; the breast typically becomes red, swollen, and warm. The breast skin may appear pitted like an orange peel, and the nipple’s shape may change, causing it to appear dimpled or inverted.

Typically, Inflammatory Breast Cancer grows rapidly and requires aggressive treatment. It may be classified as Stage 3B, 3C, or even Stage 4, depending on your physician’s diagnosis and the results of your biopsy. The treatment most oncologists recommend includes initial chemotherapy followed by a mastectomy and chest wall radiation therapy. The doctor may recommend additional chemotherapy and hormone treatments following radiation.

Related Questions

  • Heavy  Heart Profile

    What can you do/say to a stage four breast cancer patient who wants to give up her treatment (radiation and chemotherapy)?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 4 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      It is her choice. You don't have to support the decision to love her. Ask her if she has a bucket list?

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I think you have to honor her choice. Sometimes going into palliative care (not hospice) can do wonders for patients. Treatment for cancer is difficult and if she had been going through it more that once, and this is an advanced cancer that doesn't see any improvement, support this woman. The...

      more

      I think you have to honor her choice. Sometimes going into palliative care (not hospice) can do wonders for patients. Treatment for cancer is difficult and if she had been going through it more that once, and this is an advanced cancer that doesn't see any improvement, support this woman. The place where I get my --fight-up-- is when a woman gives up before having treatment at all. If this woman has had a tough go of it, and not getting better, allow her to live the rest of her life free of the pain of further treatment and free of the guilt of choosing this way. I am so sorry... Take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • Michele Aboro Profile

    Hi I have just had sugary on stage 2b cancer and wanted to ask about what food is the best to eat before I start chemotherapy. Thanks Michele

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 8 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Ali S Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Sorry...that sent too early! The morning of my chemo, I ate something, like an English muffin and an egg. While getting started I had some milk to get some protein in case I wouldnt want it later. Bland foods that day and a few days after we're all I could tolerate. Watermelon and grapes were...

      more

      Sorry...that sent too early! The morning of my chemo, I ate something, like an English muffin and an egg. While getting started I had some milk to get some protein in case I wouldnt want it later. Bland foods that day and a few days after we're all I could tolerate. Watermelon and grapes were my savior and kept my hydrated when I was t drinking fluids. Which I was all the time. Be hydrated before during and after, so your body can flush out the toxins as fast as possible. Eat what you want before, but try to keep your nora

      Comment
    • Ali S Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I pretty much ate normally, which tends to be healthy. The

      Comment
  • Cookie Neal Profile

    What is the normal length of time to do Chemo?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 3A Patient
    about 8 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      It depends.... there isn't any usual length because the diagnostics have become so specific. It depends on the type of breast cancer, are you pre or postmenopausal, size of tumor, type, stage, agressiveness. You have have two women with nearly the same diagnosis and their treatment will be...

      more

      It depends.... there isn't any usual length because the diagnostics have become so specific. It depends on the type of breast cancer, are you pre or postmenopausal, size of tumor, type, stage, agressiveness. You have have two women with nearly the same diagnosis and their treatment will be completely different. I was a 2B Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, had a mastectomy, 1 positive node er+ pr+ her2- I was 59 years old, and I only had 4 rounds of AC, and 5 years of hormone therapy. I had chemo treatments every 3 weeks. Honestly, I thought I got off very easy.

      1 comment
    • Nikol Vega Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I had 16 weeks(8 treatments) every other week. 4 of A/C and 4 of Taxol.

      Comment
  • vicki e Profile

    Yay I finished chemo today and am so happy to get on with my life! I have a PET scan on 9/10 and results on 9/12. Once I get the all clear I can get my port out! Thx for all the support. You are all awesome.

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2B Patient
    almost 8 years 24 answers
    • View all 24 answers
    • anonymous Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2006

      Congratulations and continue to stay encourage as you have encouraged so many on this site.

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I'm soooo happy for you!!! You are really brave and I respect you so much for that. Hugs jayme

      Comment

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