loading... close

Breast Cancer

 
Breast Cancer

Chapter: 3 - Breast Cancer

Subchapter: 3 - Types of Tumors

Remember, a tumor is a mass of abnormal tissue. There are two types of tumors: those that are non-cancerous, or ‘benign’, and those that are cancerous, which are ‘malignant’.

Benign Tumors
When a tumor is diagnosed as benign, doctors usually leave it alone rather than remove it. Even though these tumors are not aggressive toward surrounding tissue, they may continue to grow, pressing on organs and causing pain or other problems. In these situations, the tumor is removed, allowing pain or complications to subside.

Malignant Tumors
Malignant tumors are cancerous and aggressive, because they invade and damage surrounding tissue. When a tumor is suspected to be malignant, the doctor will preform a biopsy, a diagnostic procedure which we will cover in Sub–Chapter 4.3, to determine the severity of the tumor.

Metastatic Cancer
Metastatic cancer is when cancer cells of a malignant tumor spread to other parts of the body, usually through the lymph system, and form a secondary tumor.

Tumor Grades
Tumor grading is a system used to classify a malignant tumor based upon the severity of the mutation and the likelihood that it will spread. According to the National Cancer Institutes's tumor grading system, there are four grades: low grade (1), intermediate grade (2) and two types of high grades (3 & 4). Grade 1 tumor cells, for example, are the least aggressive in behavior; they still resemble healthy cells and multiply at a slower rate. Higher grade tumors tend to grow and spread more rapidly than tumors of a lower grade.

Tumor grades are not to be confused with cancer stages, which we will discuss in detail in Chapter 5.

In this chapter, we looked at where cancer usually begins, reasons why it grows, how it spreads, the importance of evaluating the tumor for certain receptors, and the difference between benign and malignant tumors.

Now it’s time to get a better understanding of your diagnosis.

Related Questions

  • Mrs. Collins Profile

    I am married, my hubby is great, but this is new & "scary" for him.. Any suggestions?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Life is Good! Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      It is so kind of you to be so concerned about your husband, while going through this! Enjoy some "cancer free" time with your husband. Cancer is consuming for everyone in the family, and it is good to keep some routines and normalcy. Express specifically what he can do for you and compliment...

      more

      It is so kind of you to be so concerned about your husband, while going through this! Enjoy some "cancer free" time with your husband. Cancer is consuming for everyone in the family, and it is good to keep some routines and normalcy. Express specifically what he can do for you and compliment and thank him often. My husband weAsk someone other than your husband to help communicate with family and friends. It can be exhausting to answer phone calls and emails and keep rehashing everything with everyone. He may need some alone time occasionally to process things. Keep us posted on your journey. We care about you!

      2 comments
    • Jo Rogers Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Sorry that you are going our "club", but know that it gets better once there is a plan in place and moving forward.
      My hubby was great through the whole process. He went to all the Drs
      appointments and every chemo appointment. He was also there for the surgeries and was wonderful. I think being...

      more

      Sorry that you are going our "club", but know that it gets better once there is a plan in place and moving forward.
      My hubby was great through the whole process. He went to all the Drs
      appointments and every chemo appointment. He was also there for the surgeries and was wonderful. I think being there at the appointments helped him ( and me )
      Understand exactly what was going on and the plan to beat this. He was also able to ask questions we had discussed and I forgot, or didn't think of.
      We also brought a digital recorder to
      all of the appointments so if we needed to we could replay the discussions when we had questions about " what did he say about
      ___".
      Hope this helps and know that we
      will answer any questions that you have and we will be there for you.
      God bless.

      Comment
  • Chris Alteneder Profile

    What is her2nue?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 2 answers
    • Erin Timlin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I'm HER2 as well and my oncologist told me that this cancer used to have a grimmer prognosis but Herceptin has been a home run cancer drug in the last 10 years. He says it's the best advance made in BC treatment yet!

      Comment
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      It is a gene in the cancer cell that when it is positive, it duplicates itself very rapidly. So it is then a very fast growing cancer. The good news is that there is now herceptin available that attaches to the cells & stops it from duplicating. I am her2 positive. Prayers to you.

      5 comments
  • Thumb avatar default

    How many of you were post menopausal when you were diagnosed?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I was 59 and postmenopausal. IDC 2.2CM 2B ER+ PR+ HER2-
      1 out of 5 sentinal nodes micro +

      Sharon

      6 comments
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I thought I was post menopausal when I was diagnosed at 54 (i had had a hysterectomy 12years prior) but after testing found out I was no where near going through menopause so I have to take tamoxifen for 2 years and then be tested again.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Found a lump under right arm

    Asked by anonymous

    Family Member or Loved One
    over 6 years 3 answers
    • Life is Good! Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      Finding a lump is scary. I am so glad you did not ignore it. 80% of lumps are not cancer, however, please go to the doctor asap. It's best to get it checked out right away for peace of mind and to find out what it is. Please keep us posted on the results and keep the questions coming. We are...

      more

      Finding a lump is scary. I am so glad you did not ignore it. 80% of lumps are not cancer, however, please go to the doctor asap. It's best to get it checked out right away for peace of mind and to find out what it is. Please keep us posted on the results and keep the questions coming. We are here for you!

      Comment
    • Lisa G Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      It's a scary but go have it checked out. It maybe just a lymph node reacting to an infection. Bestbwishes!

      Comment

Educational Video

Personal Story

Related Topics

Looking for another topic?
Use the search box in the top right.

Footer 1

An Early Detection Plan (EDP) significantly increases the chances of surviving breast cancer.

spread the word