loading... close

Breast Cancer

 
Breast Cancer

Chapter: 3 - Breast Cancer

Subchapter: 3 - Types of Tumors

Remember, a tumor is a mass of abnormal tissue. There are two types of tumors: those that are non-cancerous, or ‘benign’, and those that are cancerous, which are ‘malignant’.

Benign Tumors
When a tumor is diagnosed as benign, doctors usually leave it alone rather than remove it. Even though these tumors are not aggressive toward surrounding tissue, they may continue to grow, pressing on organs and causing pain or other problems. In these situations, the tumor is removed, allowing pain or complications to subside.

Malignant Tumors
Malignant tumors are cancerous and aggressive, because they invade and damage surrounding tissue. When a tumor is suspected to be malignant, the doctor will preform a biopsy, a diagnostic procedure which we will cover in Sub–Chapter 4.3, to determine the severity of the tumor.

Metastatic Cancer
Metastatic cancer is when cancer cells of a malignant tumor spread to other parts of the body, usually through the lymph system, and form a secondary tumor.

Tumor Grades
Tumor grading is a system used to classify a malignant tumor based upon the severity of the mutation and the likelihood that it will spread. According to the National Cancer Institutes's tumor grading system, there are four grades: low grade (1), intermediate grade (2) and two types of high grades (3 & 4). Grade 1 tumor cells, for example, are the least aggressive in behavior; they still resemble healthy cells and multiply at a slower rate. Higher grade tumors tend to grow and spread more rapidly than tumors of a lower grade.

Tumor grades are not to be confused with cancer stages, which we will discuss in detail in Chapter 5.

In this chapter, we looked at where cancer usually begins, reasons why it grows, how it spreads, the importance of evaluating the tumor for certain receptors, and the difference between benign and malignant tumors.

Now it’s time to get a better understanding of your diagnosis.

Related Questions

  • janine cartwright Profile

    what are the chances of me having cancer i i have an inverted nipple sometimes? and a lump found by doctor waitin scan..!

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Janine,
      This is how my cancer started with an inverted nipple. I hate to tell you this because I know you are scared. If this does turn out to be breast cancer, it is best to find it in the earliest stages. I was diagnosed at an early stage, successfully treated, and am cancer free. I hope...

      more

      Janine,
      This is how my cancer started with an inverted nipple. I hate to tell you this because I know you are scared. If this does turn out to be breast cancer, it is best to find it in the earliest stages. I was diagnosed at an early stage, successfully treated, and am cancer free. I hope this is something completely benign which happens much more often. You are doing exactly what you should.... having this checked out, asap. Please keep in touch with us. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Rosanna Wieder Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2B Patient

      I am new to this, just dx last month but it does sound like a possibility. With that said please try not to get ahead of yourself. Could be so many other things. I always say dont worry til there's something to worry about. Best of luck and please keep us posted!

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I'm 15 and i have pitting of the skin in the middle of my breasts is this normal? Also, i have been looking up information about this and i keep getting Inflammatory Breast Cancer , should i get checked out or not worry?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 4 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Keep in mind, inflammatory breast cancer is extremely rare. Some doctor's never see a case during their entire career.
      For your peace of mind, tell your Mom to make an appointment for you to have it checked. Stay off the computer for now, reading about breast cancer only scares you. Take...

      more

      Keep in mind, inflammatory breast cancer is extremely rare. Some doctor's never see a case during their entire career.
      For your peace of mind, tell your Mom to make an appointment for you to have it checked. Stay off the computer for now, reading about breast cancer only scares you. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Mandana K. Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Inflammatory breast cancer in this age is not reported yet,as a rule it is rare ,I think only 1% of all breast cancers is this type .Most of all it is similar to acute mastitis and doctors prescribe antibiotics to patients .It has warmness,redness,in near 1/3 one breast and never u touch a...

      more

      Inflammatory breast cancer in this age is not reported yet,as a rule it is rare ,I think only 1% of all breast cancers is this type .Most of all it is similar to acute mastitis and doctors prescribe antibiotics to patients .It has warmness,redness,in near 1/3 one breast and never u touch a mass.Do not response to antibiotics. Well it is better to show it to a doctor .i think it is due to mild dermatitis,but a doctor must say it and exam it

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    How can you tell a tumor from hard tissue from treatment?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 2 answers
    • Daphne Beitman Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      Get to know your breasts by doing monthly self exams and note/keep track of any abnormalities you believe you feel. A tumor will grow, normal dense tissue will not. When in doubt have your doctor schedule a mammogram, especially if you're under 40 years old with a family history of the disease....

      more

      Get to know your breasts by doing monthly self exams and note/keep track of any abnormalities you believe you feel. A tumor will grow, normal dense tissue will not. When in doubt have your doctor schedule a mammogram, especially if you're under 40 years old with a family history of the disease. If you you have no family history have a yearly mammogram beginning at 40.

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I want to use this medium to share my testimony to the public, hopefully to safe life also, Am Brandi Harri, I was diagnosed of Breast Cancer Three years ago, when i had my last baby, my world came crashing down when my Doctor told me that nothing could be done to save me after fighting this...

      more

      I want to use this medium to share my testimony to the public, hopefully to safe life also, Am Brandi Harri, I was diagnosed of Breast Cancer Three years ago, when i had my last baby, my world came crashing down when my Doctor told me that nothing could be done to save me after fighting this deadly disease with Chemo And Radiation for Two Years but i refused to sit back and wait until the day it finally decides to take my life so i went in search of help which i found in the hands of Priest Babaka through his Cannabis oil/Herb Soap Supplement. God use him to bring life back to me and gave my life a meaning again,am alive now all because of him, sir God will continue to Bless you and your family for this good work and word of truth..If you have any issue of CANCER don't hestitate to contact him with this email : babaka.wolf@gmail.com

      Comment
  • susan Richmond Profile

    Any of you ladies been diagnosed with stage 4 I DC ?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Paula McLaughlin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      Susan--I had two different primary tumors in the same breast (with 8years in between). Both tumors were small and Stage I IDC. Last year, a CT scan showed that the cancer had spread to my AP

      Comment
    • Paula McLaughlin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      I hope it's understandable! I'm a newbie with the i-pad.

      2 comments

Educational Video

Personal Story

Related Topics

Looking for another topic?
Use the search box in the top right.

Footer 3

Breast cancer affects one out of every eight women in their lifetime.

spread the word