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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Karen G Profile

    I am going in for my Oncoplasty surgery tomorrow. Please pray for me and wish me clear margins. This is my third surgery and my last try to keep my breast. If this doesn't work I will need a Mastectomy.

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    almost 6 years 13 answers
    • View all 13 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      God bless and praying for you

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Surgery isn't easy but God willing you will go through this surgery and be much healthier in the end. You are in all of our prayers. Take care, jayme

      Comment
  • Lori Schanche Profile

    How is weight gain associated with Femara?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 3 answers
    • Connie Herrick Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I am having problems with belly fat, not necessarily weight gain.

      Comment
    • rebekah alkhalifa Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      rebekahalkhalifa@yahoo.com
      Hello...
      I wish you best Compliment of the season,with hope that you are physically and healthly alright,l do believe that this mail will reach in good condition. My name is Rebekah i saw your profile in www.beyondtheshock.com and admire it, i think we can make it...

      more

      rebekahalkhalifa@yahoo.com
      Hello...
      I wish you best Compliment of the season,with hope that you are physically and healthly alright,l do believe that this mail will reach in good condition. My name is Rebekah i saw your profile in www.beyondtheshock.com and admire it, i think we can make it together, please i would like you to contact me through my email address:( rebekahalkhalifa@yahoo.com ) i will tell you more about myself, also send you my photo,as soon as you contact me back, hopping for your lovely reply soonest,
      Rebekah....

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    if you are diagnosed with inflammatory breast cancer and its in the stage 111B are there good survival rates?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 4 years 3 answers
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      I don't believe in living by numbers at any stage or kind of cancer. Stay positive, be proactive and you can live a very long life. Prayers to you.

      Comment
    • sharon s Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      They don't account for précis ting additional health issues. They don't account for the support. The exercise the decisions. The lifestyle and nutrition. Gosh. It's a statistic and who know anything from that? I'd rather live in denial than dwell in depression. So I choose to know and...

      more

      They don't account for précis ting additional health issues. They don't account for the support. The exercise the decisions. The lifestyle and nutrition. Gosh. It's a statistic and who know anything from that? I'd rather live in denial than dwell in depression. So I choose to know and then move beyond and defy. Wish me luck and you luck.

      Comment
  • Angela Kroninger Profile

    My aunt recently got diagnosed with stage three breast cancer. What does this entail and how can I help her?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 3 answers
    • Nancy Collins Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2002

      I was diagnosed with Stage III Invasive Lobular BC at 43. She'll have (I opted for mastectomy(ies), to take away as many chances as I could that it would come back, surgery, chemo and radiation. For me the hardest part was losing my hair. Be sure she finds a wig before starting chemo, or...

      more

      I was diagnosed with Stage III Invasive Lobular BC at 43. She'll have (I opted for mastectomy(ies), to take away as many chances as I could that it would come back, surgery, chemo and radiation. For me the hardest part was losing my hair. Be sure she finds a wig before starting chemo, or bandanas. I hated a wig, but I was going through chemo and radiation during the hottest part of the summer, so I wore bandanas. Just be there for her, tell her if she needs anything to let you know. We need to be as independent as we can, so someone hovering over us (me and the people I've met along the way have felt this way) isn't good. If she wants to talk, listen, but let her bring up the topic of cancer. Try to treat her like you would before her diagnosis, which I know is hard. You feel so helpless, but you just being there for her, is the great gift you can give her. She'll go through a lot of emotions, which she may or may not show around you, but PLEASE never take it personal if she gets snappy. Not only are we scared, but our bodies are going through some major changes. She's lucky to have you!!!

      Comment
    • anonymous Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      When I had the same type of breast cancer, I was living in an isolated rural area. My neighbour was wonderful. I hardly knew her, but she began leaving little packages of home-grown veggies at my door. A friend who lived 2 hours away made several trips to visit and she brought some special...

      more

      When I had the same type of breast cancer, I was living in an isolated rural area. My neighbour was wonderful. I hardly knew her, but she began leaving little packages of home-grown veggies at my door. A friend who lived 2 hours away made several trips to visit and she brought some special yogurt that had extra "healthy bacteria", because I had thrush from the chemo. Another friend who was too far away to visit, sent me a little figurine of one woman with her arm around another. Another friend from my church sent me a greeting card every week to cheer me. My pals from work brought me a gift basket with cozy pajamas, a fluffy throw, and some bath stuff. These are the things that mattered most to me when I was "going through the fire".

      You could make up some meals and freeze them for her. I could only eat soft food for a while so noodle casseroles or soups might be good. If she needs help with housework you could organize a cleaning bee. Most of all, just be there for her without smothering.

      Comment

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