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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Connie Demarest Profile

    Is chemotherapy (except aromotase inhibitors) used for stage 1 lymph node negative breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 3 answers
    • Betsy Chapin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      Hi Connie,
      You have a lot happening this week. You will get through this. Sometimes the toughest part of treatment Is waiting. I believe you will have answers when you see your oncologist this week. Stay strong.

      Comment
    • Betsy Chapin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      Yes one could have chemotherapy with a stage one diagnosis. I was stage one and had chemotherapy with no lymph node involvement due to the fact that my cancer was HER2 positive.

      Comment
  • roshan mohta Profile

    my girl frnd mother is with breast cancer.. does that mean she will also have.. secondly she had a lump in her breast during her teenage.. it has been removed. does this has any relation to cancer

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 2 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Roshan,
      I think you are asking if she can be cured of breast cancer. It all depends on the type of breast cancer, stage, grade, etc. Hopefully, this was found in an early stage and it will be successfully treated and cured.
      As for her having a lump when she was a teenager, it may or may not...

      more

      Roshan,
      I think you are asking if she can be cured of breast cancer. It all depends on the type of breast cancer, stage, grade, etc. Hopefully, this was found in an early stage and it will be successfully treated and cured.
      As for her having a lump when she was a teenager, it may or may not have anything to do in predicting she would have cancer in her future. There a many more lumps in women's breasts that turn out to be benign than turn out to be cancer. If a woman turns up with breast cancer later in life after having a lump removed as a teen, you might say it was a predictor. If she had that lump removed and never got breast cancer you could say it doesn't have anything to so with future breast cancer.
      No one really knows what causes breast cancer. Some can be a genetic component but the majority.... nobody really knows what flips the switch and makes cells divide wildly and turn into cancer. Take care, Sharon

      1 comment
    • leslie adkins Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      My mom had breast cancer. I have it. Because she had it, it was a blessing for me, because knowing I had a high risk, I kept up on my mammos, self check, etc. and the survival rate is higher for folks like me, for those same reasons.

      Comment
  • Lisa Costanza-Ramos Profile

    Are there any type of lumps in the breast that feel squishy from the outside examination?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 1 answer
    • rebekah alkhalifa Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      rebekahalkhalifa@yahoo.com
      Hello...
      I wish you best Compliment of the season,with hope that you are physically and healthly alright,l do believe that this mail will reach in good condition. My name is Rebekah i saw your profile in www.beyondtheshock.com and admire it, i think we can make it...

      more

      rebekahalkhalifa@yahoo.com
      Hello...
      I wish you best Compliment of the season,with hope that you are physically and healthly alright,l do believe that this mail will reach in good condition. My name is Rebekah i saw your profile in www.beyondtheshock.com and admire it, i think we can make it together, please i would like you to contact me through my email address:( rebekahalkhalifa@yahoo.com ) i will tell you more about myself, also send you my photo,as soon as you contact me back, hopping for your lovely reply soonest,
      Rebekah....

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    My throat is soar...they said it might get like that due to radiating my lymph nodes..."If you don't stand for something, you'll fall for anything."

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 3 answers
    • Erin Timlin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Norma, do they have your head positioned in such a way that your throat is out of the way as much as possible? I also had my super clav area radiated and when they positioned me initially they made sure my head was turned to the left (rads on right side) and that's the way they shaped my...

      more

      Norma, do they have your head positioned in such a way that your throat is out of the way as much as possible? I also had my super clav area radiated and when they positioned me initially they made sure my head was turned to the left (rads on right side) and that's the way they shaped my pillow. They try and get your throat positioned so it's not affected. I did have a slight sore throat at one point, but it didn't last. However, if it persists for you then you need to tell someone and make sure your positioning is correct. Good luck!

      1 comment
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      That happened to me........the doctor and the techs had me(they were radiating my right breast) turn my head to the left. It lifted my throat out of the way. I turned my head almost 90 degrees to the left. It worked untill itworked ensure and popsicles.

      1 comment

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Breast cancer affects one out of every eight women in their lifetime.

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