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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    Had 2nd treatment. My hair is falling out and my scalp is red and itchy. Any advice?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    almost 6 years 8 answers
    • View all 8 answers
    • Evelyn Heilbrunn Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Oh, that was awful. I have really thick hair and when it started to fall out my head really hurt! I had it shaved off and it immediately felt better. When it's gone be sure to keep your scalp moisturized. I used a touch of baby oil.

      Comment
    • Isabel Souchet Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      It usually gets itchy before falling out. Ask your onco bout something to help with that. Its very upsetting to lose your hair, but mine grew back so much nicer. Hang in there.

      Comment
  • Roberta Galipeau Wilson-Taff Martin Profile

    I need help with early detection. I have no insurance or job. Any advice?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 6 years 8 answers
    • View all 8 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Roberta,
      So I went to one of my best friend's "Mr. Google". The Health Department in your town WILL do breast screenings. Here is the office and phone numbers. It also had a list of services they perform. This is the part that pertains to you. You call them tomorrow and get in to get a...

      more

      Roberta,
      So I went to one of my best friend's "Mr. Google". The Health Department in your town WILL do breast screenings. Here is the office and phone numbers. It also had a list of services they perform. This is the part that pertains to you. You call them tomorrow and get in to get a mammogram .... please! Keep scrolling down. Sharon
      Clinic Location & Contact Information

      1808 South Hickory
      Sapulpa, Oklahoma 74066
      (918) 224-5531 Phone
      (918) 224-1739 Fax

      Adult Health
      Clinic provides annual health exams for adults of all ages both male and female. Services included are: Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening and treatment referral, Prostate Education, Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD’s) testing, along with screening and monitoring of the following chronic diseases; Cholesterol, High Blood Pressure, Diabetes.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      PLEASE LOOK FOR MY SECOND POSTING... I FOUND THE HEALTH DEPARTMENT IN YOUR TOWN THAT WILL DO BREAST SCREENINGS (MAMMOGRAMS) ADDRESS AND PHONE NUMBERS INCLUDED. Sharon

      Roberta,
      My other "Sisters" here have given you good advice about where to check for care. Right now, what you need is a...

      more

      PLEASE LOOK FOR MY SECOND POSTING... I FOUND THE HEALTH DEPARTMENT IN YOUR TOWN THAT WILL DO BREAST SCREENINGS (MAMMOGRAMS) ADDRESS AND PHONE NUMBERS INCLUDED. Sharon

      Roberta,
      My other "Sisters" here have given you good advice about where to check for care. Right now, what you need is a mammogram. I would also check with the closest American Cancer Society, Planned Parenthood, Susan G. Komen.Org. The latter two, generally have funding for free mammograms. October, is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. You have proven in spite of so many tough breaks in your life to be one stong cookie and a complete and total survivor. I wouldn't go pushing the breast cancer panic button. So many times, these can turn out to be nothing more than a scary time! Please start checking these places TOMORROW! I want you to get in to have a mammogram somewhere asap. We care about what you are going through right now. PLEASE keep in touch with us. We will help and support you as much as we can out here. Take care and God's blessings, Sharon

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    is it curable? if so, how?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 4 years 1 answer
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Is what curable? If you mean BC there are lots of things they can do for it.

      Comment
  • Aleeza Chaudhry Profile

    My mom has about two more months of chemo, five weeks of radiation, and five years of tamoxifen left for her treatment. She keeps asking when her life and body will go back to normal. Any idea of when her body will start recovering after chemo/radiation?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 5 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • anonymous Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      After chemo an rad it took my body almost 2-1/2 months. I wish I could say sooner but it was almost at the 3 month mark.
      Praying hers is much sooner. Tell her to hang in there. It will get better. For now take advantage and rest.
      God, water, walk in that order and u can survive anything.

      1 comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Stage 3C Patient

      She's in the worst of it right now and it can be discouraging. I am 4 months post chemo and 8 weeks post radiation and I am feeling pretty good, but at night I am still physically exhausted.
      She will develop a new level of normal after all this. Once chemo is over keep her busy with family things...

      more

      She's in the worst of it right now and it can be discouraging. I am 4 months post chemo and 8 weeks post radiation and I am feeling pretty good, but at night I am still physically exhausted.
      She will develop a new level of normal after all this. Once chemo is over keep her busy with family things and things she used to do. It will really help.

      1 comment

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Breast cancer affects one out of every eight women in their lifetime.

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