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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Laura Laine Profile

    Hello everyone! I am new to this community, I hope we will something in common. :)

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 5 years 3 answers
    • Trisha Muller Quinn Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2014

      If you or a family member or a friend , are fighting the evil called Breast Cancer.... Then I'm sure you do ...it's a great site to learn about the human side of the disease.... We all have or had different experiences but are linked by this common bond !! ... So welcome don't be afraid to asked...

      more

      If you or a family member or a friend , are fighting the evil called Breast Cancer.... Then I'm sure you do ...it's a great site to learn about the human side of the disease.... We all have or had different experiences but are linked by this common bond !! ... So welcome don't be afraid to asked any question you may have ,the answers will be helpful and lovely and supportive...:))

      1 comment
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      Hi Laura. Sorry you need to be here, but you've found the best place for information and support. No question is silly or too personal. I was diagnosed Feb 2012, IDC, triple possitive, bilateral mastectomy with recon using expanders, 6 rounds of TCH, a year of herceptin. Now on tamoxifen for a...

      more

      Hi Laura. Sorry you need to be here, but you've found the best place for information and support. No question is silly or too personal. I was diagnosed Feb 2012, IDC, triple possitive, bilateral mastectomy with recon using expanders, 6 rounds of TCH, a year of herceptin. Now on tamoxifen for a total of 10 years. I'm doing great, my hair is past my shoulders & I am loving life! I'm sure your very frightened now, but you can do this. Prayers to you.

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    What does it mean she they say the mass seems solid and does not have much blood flow?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 2 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      It means pretty much just that. Usually cancers have blood flows because that is how they are nourished to grow. You NEED to contact your doctor for a definite meaning in your specific case. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Mary Chase Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Ask your doctors all of the questions you can think of. Write them down and take the list to your appt. if they don't answer them in a way you can understand or don't want to spend the time them get another doctor!

      Comment
  • Nikol Vega Profile

    Should you tell your 10 year old daughter if you've been diagnosed with stage 0 (DCIS) breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Misty Wells Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Yes you should... my 10

      Comment
    • Gail Horton Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Yes, let her be a part of your journey. It will build your relationship and she will grow up understanding why early detection is so important.

      Comment
  • D D Profile

    What can I expect from a surgery biopsy and how soon are the results shared? A lump on breast is about 3.5 cm was aspirated and resulted in a bloody liquid and revealed another behind it. (3cm with hardened walls and atypical cells...I'm scared)

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 3 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi DD, yes it's very scary waiting. It usually takes at least two days (sometimes longer) to get the biopsy results in. While you're waiting ...know that 80% of biopsies are negative. I pray you're in that 80%. Hugs

      Comment
    • Lysa Allison Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I was scared too so I know how you feel. Try not to worry until you know for sure what is going on. Remember God loves you and will help you through if you just ask.

      Comment

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